Minutes of the September, 2015 Heralds Meeting

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MINUTES OF THE MONTHLY MEETING – September 20, 2015
(11:00 am to 3:55pm)

The meeting was held at Green Crown’s home. In general, all future meetings will be held at Green Crown’s home (564 Broadmoor Blvd., San Leandro, CA 94577; email greencrownwest@yahoo.com for directions).

ATTENDEES:
Frederick of Holland, Vesper; Krysta of Starfall, Green Crown; Michael of the Shire, Sable Swan; Hirsch von Henford, Golem; eilis o’Boirne, Banner; Astrid of Swansdale, Latimer; Dafydd Waleis, Nebuly P. and CoH Exchequer; Kean de Lacy, Black Mark Pursuivant; Moira O’Conner, PaL; Gwenhwyfaer ferch Gwilym, PaL; Cosma Drago, PaL; Aine inghean Tuathail, PaL; Carrick MacBrian, PE; Edith of Swansdale, Cornet; Alys Durivau.

COLLEGE OF HERALDS MEETINGS
Heralds’ Meetings for 2015: November 15 (the day after Herald’s Collegium), January 10, 2016 (at the site for 12th Night). Meetings begin at 11AM, with walk-in processing no later than 10:30AM. “Road show” meetings, if any, will be announced well in advance.

Walk-in submissions may be held over until the following meeting at the discretion of Matins.

We are conducting some preliminary name research through the West Kingdom heraldic consultation mailing list wkheralds_consults@yahoogroups.com. This list is open to all those interested in West Kingdom book heraldry: both names and devices, and either to contribute or to ask questions. To join the list, please subscribe through Yahoo or at wkheralds_consults-subscribe@yahoogroups.com. If you subscribe by e-mail, you can complete the process by replying to the confirmation e-mail; it is not necessary to log in to Yahoo. Please note that initial posts are moderated and thus may not appear on the list immediately.


REPORTS

Vesper: The Kingdom report was sent to Laurel last month (on time). There is money in the “Laurel” bank to pay for submissions.

Seawolf: (not present – sent report and deputy)

Sable Swan: Deputy: Margaret Pye.  Current reports all done and filed. Introductory Heraldry Courses in planning for new heralds including submission rules and other consultation information.  Request for voice heralds for upcoming Cynagua Coronet on Halloween weekend.

Stellanordica: (not present - brief report sent to Vesper)

Exchequer: Deposit slips are ready to be signed and sent in to CoA Exchequer.

Matins (vacant – see Green Crown report)

Green Crown: Improvements in the process for submissions are continuing. Green Crown and Brachet tested using GoToMeeting as an online meeting tool. The preliminary test was successful.  This will allow heralds living in remote locations to participate, should they express an interest. Working on getting the KLoI functionality working in OSCAR to promote more work being done in advance (and from remote locations). This will provide better training and more training opportunities. Attended classes at Pennsic: Administrative Heraldry (https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B3o-Y90DBa4CeEhSTmNHY1VicjA), Commenting on Letters of Intent (https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B3o-Y90DBa4Ca1otMnhSYzVXbU0).  Handouts are available at the attached links. Cosma Drago and Aine inghean Tuathail are actively training to step into the Matins office. Cosma will work with Green Crown to prepare the November meeting items, and will likely run the meeting.

Banner: has a functional deputy, Anne FitzRichards.  She is learning the job and will eventually take over.  Thanks to everyone for helping while Banner is sitting as Princess.

Baldric: (not present – reported via text after query from Banner) Site for Heraldic Collegium is reserved, still working on teachers and specific classes. Late report: the room at Concord (actually Walnut Creek) is reserved, Laurel will not be present, but is going to reach out to Pelican or Wreath to see if they want to come, but what else can be done to interest non-core heralds to attend? Visitors do not seem to draw others, different classes do not seem to draw others.

There was a general discussion adjunct to Badric’s report: There are currently no details about the collegium in November, like if there will be any visiting instructors coming or what will be taught. We are trying to draw current and potential heralds to the trainings. A focus that might draw some interest is how to be a local herald, including how to consult with someone, reporting, who to go to for help.

Brachet: Reviewed the submissions for this meeting in advance, sent commentary. Participated in a GoToMeeing test with Green Crown. At present, he has both the Sunday of the November meeting and 12th Night weekend off of work, so he will be in attendance.

Greencloak: (not present, no report)

Latimer: Coronet next weekend, if Latimer does not make it, Edith will take Consultation Table.  Latimer will be present for October Crown in two weeks.

Golem: Changes made to west kingdom heralds website, most minor background items. Positive feedback about the Quick Links at the top of the page. Awards List updated: there was one instance where two people got combined, report was made and it was fixed.


ANNOUNCEMENTS / Other Business

Laurel requires now 0 (zero) paper submissions – we need only one copy and Matins doesn’t mail anything to Laurel, just sends scans. Effective immediately we will only require from submitters:

Name submission: one copy and documentation
Device submission: one line drawing, one colored drawing, with documentation if needed
Badge submission: one line drawing, one colored drawing, documentation as needed
Money: $10 for name+device or name+badge, $6 for individual submissions.

Colored submissions are still required to be hand colored using markers, not crayons or pencils, and must be colored with “quality markers” so colors don’t change; we encourage the use of Crayola Classic markers. If the submission is not colored in true colors, the College is required to send it back.

SUBMISSIONS GUIDELINES

GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

MAILING LIST: The West Kingdom College of Heralds has a mailing list for internal communication. Any herald is welcome to join by request. To join the list, please subscribe at wkheralds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com.

ELECTRONIC RESOURCES: Many interesting heraldic links can be found through the SCA Heraldry web page at http://www.sca.org/heraldry, including the Laurel home page, the on-line Armorial and Ordinary (with search capabilities) and The Academy of St. Gabriel (an onomastic and heraldic consultation service). The West Kingdom Heraldry site and the West Kingdom Awards List can be accessed through the West Kingdom site, http://www.westkingdom.org. Heraldic queries may also be addressed to Vesper at herald@westkingdom.org -- answers may take a few days.

West Kingdom College of Heralds Minutes are published on the web. They may be read at or printed from the heralds' website at http://heralds.westkingdom.org/Minutes.htm.

BRACHET MEETINGS
The office of Brachet Herald was filled as of the September meeting; no commenting meetings are being held, but Brachet is brainstorming to try to do e-meetings. More news soon.


EXCERPTS FROM THE LOARS

The cover letters, acceptances and returns for the past can be found at http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/. If you are interested in responding to some of the calls for commentary put out by the Laurel Sovereign of Arms, please be sure to visit the site.

June 2015 LoAR (printed August 12, 2015) (West LoI March 25, 2015)

Cover Letter

From Laurel: Sad News

We are saddened to report the passing of two heralds on this letter. Tyr von Wolfsburg, Wimble Herald of the Outlands, and Helmut zu Julich, formerly Troichenses Pursuivant of Drachenwald and founding Baron of Barony of Drei Eichen. Both of these individuals have made substantial contributions to Heraldry in their Kingdoms and the Society, and will be greatly missed.

From Laurel: Herald Extraordinary

At KWHSS, in the Court of Her Majesty Lydr, Queen of Ealdormere, Andrewe Laurel elevated Mistress Shauna of Carrick Point, former Laurel and current Archivist, to the rank of Herald Extraordinary, and charged her to present a title before the College for registration.

From Laurel: KWHSS 2016

At KWHSS, it was announced that KWHSS 2016 will be hosted by the Kingdom of Artemisia, in the Barony of Loch Salann, (modernly Salt Lake City, UT) on the 28-30th of April 2016.

From Laurel: Crowns for Pelican and Wreath

At KWHSS this year, the lack of crowns for Wreath & Pelican was again discussed. Given that the 50th year celebration is coming up, most felt it would be amazing to have crowns available for Wreath & Pelican at this event.

The College of Arms cannot afford to fund crowns for Wreath & Pelican. Cormac Decrescent has graciously agreed to lead a fundraising effort. If you are interested in helping out in any way, please contact Cormac at scacormac@gmail.com.

From Pelican: Legal Name Attestation

Lately, we have had a number of submissions using the legal name allowance, but where neither a copy of the legal documentation (e.g., driver's license) nor a proper attestation has been provided. In at least one case, the submitter provided a photocopy of a driver's license, which was mentioned in the Letter of Intent as being available, but it was not included in the packet.

The July 2012 Cover Letter states:

This month questions were asked about how heralds may attest that they have seen legal identification for the legal name allowance. Let me begin by saying that for most submissions, we expect photocopies of the submitter's identification. Attestation should be used only at locations where photocopies cannot be easily made (like camping events) or where making photocopies is prohibited by law.

Where photocopies cannot easily be made, heralds may attest that they have seen the identification. Such attestation must include the following: the type of identification, the complete name exactly as it appears on the identification (for example noting that the name is rendered completely in capital letters), the names and titles of two heralds who have seen the identification (herald/pursuivant at large is a title), and the signature or initials of those heralds. If signatures cannot be obtained, the herald may confirm that he or she has seen the documentation in commentary (internal or external - in the case of internal commentary the Letter of Intent should note that it was confirmed). At a local event where only a single herald is available, another officer (seneschal, for example) can serve as a second witness. An attestation that fails this standard will not be considered adequate documentation for a name element that depends on the legal name allowance.

This has not changed. In most cases, we have been able to document the legal names in question to period, but in others the legal name allowance is the only way to register a name submission. Without meeting our standards for using the legal name allowance, these submissions are at risk of being returned or having the problematic element dropped if it cannot be independently documented.

As a reminder to all submissions heralds, if a copy of the legal documentation is uploaded in the packet, please ensure that it is marked private.

From Wreath: On Hats

Two submissions this month proposed to register hats. Because hats have always shown a huge variety of shapes and size, we cannot define a "generic" standard hat. All registerable hats need to be clearly defined so as to be reproducible from the blazon.

West Acceptances - June LoAR

Æsa Vthyrmsdottir. Name (see PENDS for device).

Annora Underdowne. Device. Purpure semy of feathers argent, on a sun Or an oak leaf vert.

Bera Eðvarðardóttir. Name change from holding name Bera of the West.

Submitted as Bera Edvardardottir, the submitter requested authenticity for "Viking era Scandinavia". The name was changed to Bera Eðvarðardóttir by kingdom to match the documentation that could be found.

Bera is found in Iceland in the Landnámabók and in Egil's Saga, dated to c.1230. The patronym is derived from the name Eðvarðar, a Norse form of the English Eadweard. Therefore, we do not know if there two elements would have been used in the same time and place. Therefore, it is likely not authentic, but it is registerable.

Caitilin O'Byrne. Name.

Submitted as Caitlin O'Byrne, the submitted spelling of the given name could not be documented to period. Therefore, we have changed the spelling change to Caitilin.

This name combines a Gaelic given name and Anglicized Irish byname. This is an acceptable lingual mix under Appendix C of SENA.

Clare Elena de Montfort. Name change from Clare Elena of Strathclyde.

The submitter's previous name, Clare Elena of Strathclyde, is released.

Conrad Richter. Name and device. Per bend sinister gules and sable, a Maltese cross argent charged with four ermine spots heads to center sable.

The submitter requested authenticity for "14-1500s German" in the Nuremburg region. As documented in the Letter of Intent, this name combines 15th century elements from Rottweil and Nuremburg, which are in different regions of Germany. After the Pelican decision meeting, Ælfwynn Leoflæde dohtor documented the spelling Conrad to Würzburg in 1409 (citing Seibicke). Both Würzburg and Nuremburg are found in the region of Franconia. Therefore, this name meets the submitter's request for authenticity.

This name does not conflict with the registered Konrad Rickert. A syllable in the byname (-ter versus -ert) has been substantially changed under PN3C2 of SENA.

The modern novelist named Conrad Richter is not important enough to protect.

Please let the submitter know that properly drawn, a Maltese cross should have four deeply notched arms, converging to a central point (or very nearly); and that each arm should take up an angle as wide as the space between the arms. For a period depiction see http://coblaith.net/Heraldry/Crosses/period.html#Maltesefamily.

Cynagua, Principality of. Reblazon of badge for Office of the Gold Key. Quarterly Or and argent, on a pale sable a key inverted Or.

Blazoned when registered in October 1981 as Quarterly Or and argent, on a pale sable a key Or, the key is inverted.

Dafydd Waleis. Name and device. Or, a closed book palewise and on a chief wavy azure two keys inverted in saltire argent.

The submitter requested authenticity request for a Welsh name. This request was not summarized in the Letter of Intent. Luckily for the submitter, we had enough information to consider this request rather than pending the name for further commentary.

The given name Dafydd is found in BL Cotton Cleopatra MS. B V part i, dated to c.1300-1350. The byname waleis is found in NLW MS. Peniarth 20 (page 294), dated to the same time. Both are found in "Welsh Prose 1300-1425" (http://www.rhyddiaithganoloesol.caerdydd.ac.uk/en/). Therefore, this name is authentic for 14th century Wales and meets the submitter's request.

Derelei filia Uoret. Name (see RETURNS for device).

Derelei filia Uoret. Badge. (Fieldless) A goose azure.

Hase of Darkwood. Name and device. Per chevron gules and sable, a chevron argent between three oak leaves slipped and fructed one and two Or and a sword argent.

Darkwood is the registered name of an SCA branch.

Jak Wyldmy. Name (see RETURNS for device).

Jay d' Argent. Reblazon of device. Sable, a bend argent between a wyvern erect Or and on a flame Or a salamander statant contourny gules.

Registered in August of 1980 as Sable, a bend argent between a wyvern erect Or and a salamander counter-statant gules, enflamed Or the relation between flame and salamander can be more appropriately described as a tertiary salamander on the flame.

Jeannette of Bois d'Arc. Device. Per fess vert and sable, a tree Or between and supported in base by two stags salient respectant argent.

Kathryn Fitzroy of Bath. Reblazon of device. Vert, a harbor seal couchant to sinister reguardant Or, gorged with a chain pendant therefrom a key inverted sable, atop a rock argent, in chief three bezants one and two.

Blazoned when registered in July 1974 as Vert, a harbor seal couchant to sinister reguardant proper, gorged with a chain, pendant therefrom a key reversed sable upon an orthoclase-granite rock proper, in chief three bezants mal-ordonnee, the harbor seal is distinctly Or, not proper. Likewise, while the rock is drawn with tiny pink specks, it is largely argent. And finally, we have reblazoned the arrangement of the bezants in terms that are far more familiar.

Lavinia Elizabeth Lambert. Reblazon of device. Argent, issuant from a maunch gules charged with a cinquefoil argent, a dexter hand proper maintaining a chain pendant therefrom a key inverted, a gore sinister vert.

Blazoned when registered in May 1992 as Argent, issuant from a maunch gules charged with a cinquefoil argent, a dexter hand proper maintaining a key, a gore sinister vert, we are clarifying the arrangement and orientation of the key.

Michiele l'encriere. Name.

Submitted as Michièle l'encriere, the grave accent in the given name is a modern editorial addition. We have removed it in order to register this name.

Mór ingen Donnchada. Name.

Submitted as Mór mac Donnchada, the submitter requested authenticity request for the 12th century and expressed a preference for a Scottish name. The name was changed in kingdom to Mór ingen Donnchaid in order to try to meet the submitter's request for a 12th century Scottish name.

As submitted, the name combines a 12th century Irish Gaelic feminine given name and a 12th century Scottish Gaelic byname meaning "Donnchad's son". We have no evidence of women using the masculine particle mac in Gaelic in period, so mac Donnchada or mac Donnchaid cannot be combined with a feminine given name like Mór. A wholly 12th century Irish Gaelic form of the name using the feminine particle meaning "daughter" is Mór ingen Donnchada.

Although the given name and patronym can be documented or constructed in the 12th century, the given name was not found in Scotland at this time. Therefore, the submitted name did not meet the submitter's request for an authentic 12th century Scottish name. When contacted by kingdom, the submitter indicated that she preferred the authentic Irish form Mór ingen Donnchada. Therefore, we have changed the name to this form.

Rebecca da Firenze. Name and device. Azure, in fess two harps, a point pointed, a chief Or.

Rebecca was documented in the Letter of Intent as a Jewish name found in France. Jewish names can be combined under Appendix C of SENA with other Jewish names and other names from the same region (France).

Alexander Beider's A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names, s.n. Rifke states that, "[t]here is no proof that Christian forms of this biblical name were ever used by Jews; therefore, several references to Rebecca (and its variants) in Christian documents are likely a substitute for Jewish forms". Rebecca is a biblical name in the French book Déclamation sur l'incertitude, vanité et abus des sciences , traduite en françois du latin de Henry Corneille Agr(ippa) (par Louis de Mayerne-Turquet) , published in Paris in 1582 (p. 379, http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k6266273s). In addition, Rebecca and the variant spelling Rebeca are found in list of French parishioners, dated to 1648 and 1642-3, respectively, in The Registers of the French Church, Threadneedle Street, London, Volume 13 (pp. 91 and 113, https://books.google.com/books?id=zuU5AQAAMAAJ).

This name combines a French given name and Italian byname. This is an acceptable lingual mix under C of SENA.

Ruaidrí Mac Síthigh. Name change from Ciaran Mac Sithigh.

The submitter's previous name, Ciaran Mac Sithigh, is released.

Tancorix filia Brid. Name and device. Per pale Or and purpure, two foxes combattant each maintaining a lit candle counterchanged.

Brid is the registered given name of the submitter's mother, so is grandfathered to the submitter. At the Pelican decision meeting, Green Staff also documented Brid as a masculine given name found in PASE as early as the mid-9th century, so it is compatible with the 5th century Tancorix, without relying on the grandfather clause. We note that examples of nominative or vernacular forms of a parent's name are occasionally found after filius/filia, although Latinized genitive forms are more common.

Wilhelm von Schlüssel. Reblazon of device. Azure, on a fess between two keys fesswise argent a key fesswise azure.

Blazoned when registered in September 1971 as Azure, a fess argent, three keys fesswise in pale counterchanged, we are reblazoning to clarify the charge groups.

William Korwynson of Starfall. Name and device. Per chevron inverted ermine and azure, in pale a sword inverted gules and a phoenix close affronty head to sinister issuant from base Or.

The Letter of Intent argued that Korwynson is grandfathered to the submitter, as Korwyn is the registered given name of the submitter's father. However, under long-standing precedent and under PN1B2g of SENA, the grandfather clause requires the use of the exact name phrase that is registered, not a variant:
In a new personal name submission, an individual may use name phrases already registered to them, even if that name phrase would no longer be allowed under the current rules. Only the exact, actual name phrase from the registered form may be used, not variants, patterns, etc. The use of the grandfather clause does not allow the submitter to evade new style problems (as discussed in PN.2 below). It only allows the submitter to keep style problems that already exist with the registered name.

A name phrase from a registered name of an individual may also be registered by a close legal relative (such as parent, spouse, child, sibling, etc.). To do this, the submitter must demonstrate the relationship through legal documents or through attestation of relationship from the individual whose name is already registered. Documentation under the grandfather clause does not exempt a name or name phrase from conflict, presumption, or offense rules, unless that rules violation is itself grandfathered.

SENA reflects long-standing precedent that only the exact registered name phrase can be grandfathered. Modifications such as changing the gender of a patronymic marker or changing the registered name phrase to a genitive form are not permitted under this allowance. Although we have precedent stating that adding patronymic or matronymic markers like ben and filius/filia is acceptable before a grandfathered name phrase, it is not clear whether adding a suffix like -son to an otherwise unmodified name phrase is also permitted.

However, rather than pend this submission for further discussion, we are able to construct this element in Middle English:

The byname Corwin is dated to 1438 in 'Rymer's Foedera with Syllabus: January-March 1438', in Rymer's Foedera, Volume 10, pp. 682-695 (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/rymer-foedera/vol10/pp682-695). The spelling Corwyn is plausible with an i/y switch. Reaney & Wilson, s.nn. Corwin and Corden implies that corwen is a 15th century form of this name, with 13th century dated forms Corduan and Kordewan. Other examples of an initial C/K switch include de la Cote/atte Kote (s.n. Cote), Corneys/Korneys (s.n. Cornish), and Cosser/le Kosser' (s.n. Cossar). The introduction of Reaney & Wilson includes examples of the pattern of adding -son to bynames in Middle English, such as Wrightson, Taylourson, and Saunderson. Therefore, the patronymic form Korwynson is a plausible Middle English byname, although the spelling Corwynson or Corwinson is more likely.

The byname of Starfall is the registered byname of the submitter's mother, and is grandfathered to the submitter.

Wulfgar Wartooth. Device. Sable, three drinking horns fretted in triangle and an orle argent.

West Pends - June LoAR

Æsa Vthyrmsdottir. Device. Azure, three suns Or each charged with a rose gules seeded Or.

This device submission is pended because it was deemed that the suns charged with the roses gules are too similar to roses en soleil and therefore we want to discuss the protection of Edward IV of England's badge: a rose en soleil. The OandA notes the protection of (Fieldless) A rose en soleil argent as important non-SCA badge. However, the Glossary of Terms lists as a restricted charge " Rose en soleil: A rose with sunbeam for (Plantagenet kings of England)". Finally, in a tentative list of 'important' mundane armory, Palimpsest herald listed EDWARD IV OF ENGLAND. Badge. A rose en soleil. [He used both the white rose of York and the red rose of Lancaster as the occasion demanded. The tinctureless form is from his Great Seal. {I would protect this only with the rose gules or argent.}]

Thus, commenters are asked to discuss if we should maintain the protection of the rose en soleil in a tinctureless form or limit the protection to the argent and/or gules forms.

This was item 1 on the West letter of March 25, 2015.

West Returns - June LoAR

Derelei filia Uoret. Device. Azure, on a chevron cotised Or three crescents pendant palewise azure.

This device is returned for redraw. The cotises are too thin and too close to the chevron and become undistinguishable from the chevron.

Jak Wyldmy. Device. Quarterly azure and argent, a lion sejant affronty Or.

This device is returned for conflict with the device of Michael Vladimir Gerewolf: Per pale ermine and counter-ermine, a three-headed cheetah sejant affronty, outer heads addorsed, Or. There is one DC for changing the field, but no DC for lion versus cheetah and also no DC for one head vs three heads.

It is not in conflict with the device of Ysar de la Nuit Blanche: Sable, an African lion couchant affronty, forepaws crossed proper, orbed vert. Although in this case proper counts as Or, the lion couchant affronty is effectively a demi-lion, providing a DC for type of charge. There is another DC for changing the field.

July 2015 LoAR (printed September 16, 2015) (No West LoI)

Cover Letter

From Laurel: New College of Arms Exchequer

We are pleased to announce that Mistress Genevieve Marie Etiennette de Montagne, of An Tir, will be filling the position of College of Arms Exchequer. Etiennette was most previously the Kingdom Exchequer of An Tir, and has great experience to draw on for her time as the CoA Exchequer. The "Send What to Whom" section has been updated for financial mailings, as has the exchequer@heraldry.sca.org email address.

From Laurel: Thanks be to Rory!

We would like to offer our thanks to Master Rory ua Riada for his second time service as the College of Arms Exchequer. Master Rory has been invaluable in keeping the College of Arms functioning smoothly. We offer our well wishes and thanks for his service.

From Laurel: Forms of Address

At the July meeting of the Board of Directors, Laurel requested the Board uphold a policy interpretation regarding Laurel approval of forms of address. The Board chose not to uphold Laurel regulation of forms of address, instead relegating those decisions to individual kingdoms.

From Wreath: The Grapes of Wreath

The question has come up recently and although this should appear shortly in the new and improved Glossary of Terms, grapes proper are defined as grapes purpure. If they are slipped (and leaved) that portion is vert.

From Wreath: No more valknuts inverted

The valknut is a period artistic motif which was not used in period heraldry. Its use carries a step from period practice. Because valknuts are not period heraldic charges, there is no documented pattern of inverting them. Thus, barring period evidence, inverted valknuts will not be registerable after the December 2015 meeting.

From Pelican: Real-world heraldic titles

This month, we pended a heraldic title to allow discussion of whether it presumed upon a real-world title that had been used by a herald who served the King of Castille in 1423. Under current precedent, we protect all heraldic titles that were used by heralds in service to kings and similar nobles in a more than incidental way. This includes a large number of titles that are not well known or historically important as well as important titles. We are therefore asking for additional discussion about which historical titles are worthy of protection. In particular, we ask consideration of the question of whether all heraldic titles that were used by royal appointees should be protected, or whether only the very prominent titles deserve this protection. If the latter, how should we characterize the prominence? Some titles are important because of the importance of the position, like Garter and Montjoy. Others are important because a herald who held that title wrote a book, like Gelre. Others are important because they are still in use, like Bluemantle.

West Acceptances -- July LoAR

Darkwood, Barony of. Reblazon of device. Argent, an oak tree sable fructed argent, capped Or, and on a chief sable three laurel wreaths Or.
Blazoned in September 1988 as Argent, a oak sable, fructed Or and argent, on a chief sable, three laurel wreaths Or, the blazon didn't indicate that it's an oak tree. The acorns are actually argent capped Or.

In Service,
Krysta of Starfall,
Green Crown Pursuivant


SUBMISSONS – August (2015)

ITEMS SENT TO LAUREL

Jak Wyldmy (Device RESUB to Laurel, LoPtC)

Quarterly azure and argent a lion sejant affronty Or.
This device was returned by Laurel on the LoAR for June 2015: Device is in conflict with the device of Michael Vladimir Gerewolf: Per pale ermine and counter-ermine, a three-headed cheetah sejant affronty, outer heads addorsed, Or. There is one DC for changing the field, but no DC for lion versus cheetah and also no DC for one head vs three heads.

Michael Vladimir Gerewolf has supplied a letter of permission to conflict, which has been forwarded to Laurel.


SUBMISSONS – September (2015)

ITEMS SENT TO LAUREL

Amira of Golden Rivers (NEW name, NEW device)

Will not accept Major changes; Gender: female; no authenticity request.

Amira – Legal name allowance (SENA PN1.B.2.e), Amira is submitter’s legal middle name per submitted copy of her Social Security Administration card. Also, “Amira” is a title meaning “Princess” as shown in “Period Arabic Names and Naming Practices” by Da'ud ibn Auda (David B. Appleton) http://heraldry.sca.org/names/arabic-naming2.htm; per SENA PN.4.B.1, we do not register royal titles as given names IF the surname is a locative that creates presumption. We do not believe that Golden Rivers will ever advance to Principality status, and cite “Amira of Raven's Cove,” registered in September of 2013 (via Atlantia) as an example of the recent registration of this name with a locative that does NOT violate SENA PN.4.B.1.

of – locative article required by “SCA placename” rule

Golden Rivers – registered name of a Province in the Kingdom of the West (August 1977)

The name formation [given + anglicized locative article + SCA locative byname] is appropriate for names formed using the Branch Name Allowance, as shown in PN1.B.2.f in SENA.

Submitter’s first alternate name is “Lyric of Cynagua,” should the College of Arms find that “Amira of Golden Rivers” does violate PN.4.B.1. “Lyric” is documented as submitter’s given name on the submitted copy of her Social Security Administration card in Laurel’s packet. Cynagua is a registered SCA Branch (Oct. 1979).

Armory:
Azure, on a bend sinister between two rabbits rampant each maintaining a drawn longbow argent, three decrescents palewise purpure.

No conflicts found. Submitter will be instructed to draw the decrescents in a more uniform palewise orientation, and in a better spaced manner upon the bend sinister.


Bernhardt Barkenhausen (NEW name, NEW device)

Changes boxes unmarked; Important – nothing marked; Gender: nothing marked; no authenticity request

Bernhardt – Found in “German Names from Rottweil, Baden-Württemberg, 1441” by Sara L. Uckelman known in the SCA as Aryanhwy merch Catmael. Bahlow (Dictionary of German Names) p. 42, states that Bernhard, with or without a “t”, was the commonest name in northern Germany in the Middle Ages. No specific dates are given.

Barkenhausen – Brechenmacher volume 1, p. 73: Barkenhausen, 1526.

The German name formation [given + byname] is shown in Appendix A in SENA.

Armory:
Argent, a bull and a bear combatant sable, a bordure azure.

No conflicts found.



Catherine de Mailly (NEW name, NEW device)

Changes boxes unmarked; no comments made; no authenticity request

Catherine – this spelling found in “Names found in a French Marriage Register, 1595”, by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (Sara L. Friedemann) [http://heraldry.sca.org/names/french/french1595.html] and “Names from Lallaing 1384 – 1600,” by Domhnall na Moicheirghe (Donald Campbell) [http://heraldry.sca.org/names/lallaing_names.html]

de – French locative article per SENA Appendix A

Mailly – Dauzat, p. 405, shows Mailly, under the header Mail, but has no specific dates for this spelling. It is also found on the “Racines et histoire” website [http://racineshistoire.free.fr/LGN/PDF/Mailly.pdf] dated as early as 1508.

The French name formation [given + article + locative] is shown in Appendix A in SENA.

We note Caitlín ní Mháille, registered in March of 1996 (via the Outlands); we believe the change of “ni” to “de” clears any conflict. We also note Katherine O'Mally, registered in July of 1997 (via the East); again, “O” to “de” should clear it.

Armory:
Or, a bend gules cotised sable between two fleur-de-lys sable.

No conflicts found. Submitter will be advised that the bend could be drawn a bit wider (opined by both Vesper and Brachet). We are aware that the first "sable" in the blazon may be unnecessary, however, if left out the cotises could be thought to have been inserted in the wrong place, and end up depicted as gules rather than sable. This adds only one word, and makes their tincture unmistakable.


Charles van den Haag (NEW name, NEW device; See RETURNS for Badge)

Name as it appears on the form: Charles Van Den Haag; Important – Meaning: First name “Charles”, last name appropriate for 1350s Holland; Gender: male; no authenticity request

Charles – Withycombe p. 62-62. Introduced to England by the Normans and occasional from the 12th century on. Charles 1273.

van den – documented at “Names from Antwerp, 1443-1561” by Sara L. Uckelman and Kym Banoczi, known in the SCA as Aryanhwy merch Catmael and Kymma Godric http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/dutch/surnamesplaiser.html. The URL for the "senior" web page is http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/dutch/plaiser.html. There are several examples. The form is also documented with several examples in Names from Leyden, 1463-1464, by Sara L. Uckelman, known in the SCA as Aryanhwy merch Catmael at http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/dutch/15thcleyden.html. It appears that [van den] should NOT be capitalized, so we have changed the submitted form.

Haag – Huizinga, p. 92. Place names that are "steads" in the Netherlands, apparently as [den Haag]. Undated. [Haaghe] is dated to 1400-1550 on the bynames page for Flemish Names from Bruges by Luana de Grood (Loveday Toddekyn)  http://www.s-gabriel.org/docs/bruges/byname-list2.html.

Charles is NOT the Dutch form, but according to Appendix C of SENA, it is compatible with 14th and 15th century Dutch. The Dutch name formation [given + van den + locative] is shown in Appendix A in SENA.

Armory:
Argent, a gurges vert.

No conflict found.


Cloondara, Shire of (NEW badge, name registered Aug. 1985)

Or, three chevronels abased vert, overall two towers in fess gules.

Signed petition included in Laurel packet. No conflicts found.



Conn MacKay (NEW name, NEW device)

Changes boxes unmarked; no comments made; no authenticity request

Conn – Found in “Fourteenth to Sixteenth Century Irish Names and Naming Practices (The Fitzwilliam Accounts)” by Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn (Heather Rose Jones) http://heraldry.sca.org/names/lateirish/

MacKay – Found in “Surnames of Scotland”, Black, 522 s.n. MACKAY. There is no certain date for this spelling, but the name family seems to reach from the 14th through 16th centuries and into present day. Black does state that a charter was granted in 1408 to Brian vicar Mackay of Islay. However, the form of the name used in the charter, which is the only extant land charter written in Gaelic, was [Brian Bhicaire Magaodh]. Black lists many variant spellings of [MacKay] prior to 1600. Although the spelling [MacKay] is not one of these, it falls within the range of variation shown.

The late-period Irish name formation [given + byname] is shown in Appendix A in SENA.

Armory:
Per saltire lozengy argent and vert, and argent, two wolverines combatant sable marked argent.

No conflicts found.


Conor MacKaylly (NEW name)

Changes boxes unmarked; Important – Language, Irish; Gender: male; no authenticity request

Conor – from “Names Found in Anglicized Irish Documents: Men's Names” by Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada (Kathleen M. O'Brien) http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/Masculine.shtml under “Connor.”

MacKaylly – found in “Names and Naming Practices in the Red Book of Ormond (Ireland 14th Century) Glossary of Elements in Bynames” by Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn (Heather Rose Jones) http://heraldry.sca.org/names/lateirish/ormond-glossary.html#Glossary - In mac-patronyms: Ceallach: McKaylly

Name on submission form is “McKaylly,” however, the CoA does not register the scribal shorthand form “Mc”, so we have changed the submitted name to the acceptable “Mac.”

The late period Irish name formation [given + marked patronymic byname/clan name] is shown in Appendix A in SENA and discussed in “Names Found in Anglicized Irish Documents” by Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada (Kathleen M. O'Brien) http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnglicizedIrish/.

We note Conchobhar mac Cillene, registered in May of 2014 (via the Outlands); we believe the pronunciation would clear any conflict, but would ask the College of Arms to confirm.


Cosma Drago (CHANGE of Device, Name registered April 2015)

Purpure, chausse argent.

No conflict found. Her currently registered device, Purpure chaussé, a sea dragon erect and a chief triangular argent (April 2011, Ansteorra) is to be retained as a badge.

The division chaussé (shod) is formed by connecting the upper two corners to the base point. The two flanks created by these lines are the chaussé. They are rarely charged. In blazoning, the central part of the field is named first: Gules, chaussé argent means that the middle (upper and larger) piece of the field is red and the two lower flanks are white. In contrast, a pile is a wedge-shaped charge issuing from the top edge of the field and ending just above the base point. Sometime a pile is drawn so that it reaches all the way to the opposite edge of the field. This is blazoned a pile throughout. It is occasionally found in period armory, and is an artistic variation. For medieval heraldic art, the pile should be about 1/2 the width of the field. Modern heraldry often uses a wider pile--about 3/4 the width of the field--and that version is occasionally found in late-period English arms. The division per chevron begins at the flanks, one third to one quarter of the way up from the base. The point should be acute (less than 90 degrees) and should reach nearly to the top edge of the field. If the field is charged, charges are best placed in dexter chief, sinister chief, and/or base. Charges should not be placed above the point of the division. When blazoning the division, the upper tincture is named first. Conversely, per chevron inverted would begin one-quarter to one-third of the way DOWN the sides from the top corners, and would leave space sufficient for a charge between the point and the base point, unless blazoned “throughout.”


Cynehild Cynesigesdohtor (NEW badge, name registered April 2010)

[fieldless] seated upon the back of a bear passant argent, a blonde caucasian woman affronty proper vested azure.

No conflicts found.



Dolce Olivia Veneziana (NEW name, NEW device)

Will not accept Major changes; Important – sound (none noted) and Language (none noted); Gender: female; no authenticity request

Dolce – According to the Academy of St. Gabriel report #2485, [Dolce] is a woman’s name that was used in Italy the fifteenth century. Also found in “Florentine Renaissance Resources: Online Tratte of Office Holders 1282-1532: List of Given Names (Name1) Found in the Tre Maggiori” edited by David Herlihy, R. Burr Litchfield, and Anthony Molho [http://cds.library.brown.edu/projects/tratte/doc/name1.html].

Olivia – Found in “Names from Sixteenth Century Venice” by Juliana de Luna (Julia Smith) http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/16thcvenice.html

Veneziana – Found in “Names from an Early 16th C Census of Rome” by Sara L. Uckelman  (Aryanhwy merch Catmael) http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/italian/leofemfreq.html as an adjectival locative (the Venetian) noted on the census form, but not as a locative byname (from/of Venice).

The Italian name formation [given + given + locative] is shown in Appendix A in SENA. We would appreciate confirmation that the adjectival locative formation would be appropriate for Italian.

Armory:
Or, a cluster of grapes slipped and leaved proper, a sinister gore purpure ermined Or.

No conflicts found.


Donnubán se Reade (NEW name, See RETURNS for device)

Will not accept Major changes; Important – Sound (none noted); Gender: male; no authenticity request

Donnubán – Found in “Index of Names in Irish Annals: Donnduban” by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (Kathleen M. O’Brien) http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Donnduban.shtml.

se Reade – Found in “Diplomatarium Anglicum Aevi Saxonici” by Benjamin Thorpe, https://books.google.com/books?id=qZpTAAAAcAAJ&pg=PR41&lpg=PR41&dq=Diplomatarium+Anglicum+Aevi+Saxonici&source=bl&ots=JkHXhbW541&sig=dmnxZmMS_fremQ-XXd6DgCgijEU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CD4Q6AEwBmoVChMIwtjr2crsxwIVDn2ICh1-iAGa#v=onepage&q=Leofwine&f=false <Leofwine se Reade> trans. Leofwine the Red. Also found on the PASE database http://www.pase.ac.uk/jsp/persons/CreatePersonFrames.jsp?personKey=15266 as Leofwine 58, dated to 1016-1020.

The Old English name formation is shown in “Diplomatarium Anglicum Aevi Saxonici,” above. The combination of Middle Irish Gaelic and Old English is permitted per Appendix C in SENA.


Elsa Näherin von Aurec (NEW name, NEW device)

Unmarked changes boxes; Important – Meaning (Näherin = seamstress), Language/Culture (Frisia, Lower Saxony, Hanover 1250-1300); Gender: female; no authenticity request

Elsa – Found in “Mittelhochdeutsches Namenbuch: nach oberrheinischen Quellen des zwölften und dreizehnten Jahrhunderts” by Adolf Socin (http://reader.digitale-sammlungen.de/de/fs3/object/display/bsb10930484_00812.html) linked from http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/german.shtml p. 53; dated to 1283, 1299.

Näherin – Found in Brechenmacher, v2 p.304, SN Näher: Han Nähe d. 1514; Appolonia Näherin zu Hailtingen d. 1546

von – locative article per SENA Appendix A for German

Aurec – Refers to the town of Aurich, Lower Saxony. This spelling is found in Der Brokmerbrief, a Frisian governing document, as [Aurec howe]. Der Brokmerbrief is dated to 1276 in Wilhelm Hauser’s “Altfriesisches Lesebuch” pub. 1903. Additionally, according to the text on p. 325 of Untersuchungen über friesische Rechtsgeschichte, Part 1, https://books.google.com/books?id=345KAAAAYAAJ by Karl Otto Johannes Theresius Freiherr von Richthofen, this location is recorded in the Brokmerbrief as [Aurec-howe] in a list of villages/towns. Latimer notes, however, “I don’t know enough about the evolution of such names in German to say whether [von Aurec] is a correct formation based on this documentation, or whether it should be [von Aurechowe] or [von Aurechove]. The latter is the alternate spelling of these communities that is used in the Brokmerbrief.”

The German name formation [given + occupational byname + locative article + locative] is shown in Appendix A in SENA. We would request the College of Arms assistance in the correct spelling of this placename and formation of the name as a whole.

Armory:
Per fess wavy argent estoily azure, and azure, in base a lion dormant Or armed gules.

No conflict found.


Éua ingen Tuathail (NEW name, NEW device)

Unmarked changes boxes; Important – Language (12th Century Scottish Gaelic); Gender: female; no authenticity request

Éua – Found in “A Simple Guide to Constructing 12th Century Scottish Gaelic Names” by Sharon L. Krossa http://heraldry.sca.org/names/simplescotgaelicnames12.htm sn. Given Names: Women: Éua. The source material for this article is “Book of Deer,” a 9th century illustrated manuscript of some of the gospels, written in Latin. The Gaelic notes regarding land grants to the monastery of Deer which were written in the blank spaces of the manuscript contribute the pertinent information.

ingen – patronymic article per SENA Appendix A for Old/Middle Gaelic

Tuathail – Found in “Found in “Index of Names in Irish Annals” by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (Kathleen M. O’Brien) http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Tuathal.shtml; used here in the genitive form.

The Old/Middle Gaelic name formation [given + pat. article + pat] is shown in Appendix A in SENA and http://medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/.

Armory:
Or, three pommes, each charged with a quatrefoil knot argent, a chief indented sable.

Submitter will be advised to feed her chief and take it to an orthodontist. No conflicts found.



Genevieve Elizabeth of Roseberry Topping (RESUB Device to Laurel, Name registered May 2008)

Per chevron embattled gules and argent, two roses argent and a dragon gules.

Her previous submission, Per chevron embattled gules and argent, two roses argent slipped and leaved in chevron vert, and a dragon gules, was returned on the February 2015 LoAR, stating, “This device is returned for violating SENA A3D2c, Unity of Posture and Orientation, which states "A charge group in which postures for different charges must be blazoned individually will not be allowed without period examples of that combination of postures." The charges here are not in a unified arrangement, as the roses must be blazoned separately from the dragon in order to adequately describe their positioning.”

This submission addressed the unity of posture issue by removing the stems from the roses. No conflicts found.



Hosokawa Yoshitatsu (NEW name, NEW device)

Will not accept Major changes; Important – Meaning (none noted); Gender: male; no authenticity request; Will NOT allow a holding name

Yoshitatsu – Nanori (given name) found in “Name Construction in Mediaeval Japan” by Solveig Throndardottir (Rev. ed. 2004), p. 297. Also here: http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/solveig/nanori/nanoriy.html (same base source) This name is apparently an addition in the second edition of Solveig’s book – it does not appear under the header in the 1994 edition. Nor does it appear in any of the other listings for the element [yoshi]. However, [yoshi] appears as a name element in several categories (pp. 119, 156, 178, 214, 223, 230, 245, 251, 252, 253, 263, 283) and [tatsu] appears in more than one category (p. 112, 154, 172, 173).

Hosokawa – Family name found in “Name Construction in Mediaeval Japan” by Solveig Throndardottir (Rev. ed. 2004), p. 106, also found on pp. 150, 318 and 404. Also found in the historical surnames on p. 316 of the 1994 edition of Solveig’s book, and in the thematic dictionary of name elements on pages 105, 148 and 316.

This wholly Japanese name is presented in the “surname nanori” order as shown in Solveig Throndardottir’s “Name Construction in Medieval Japan.” The elements are taken from the same source and are therefore, by precedent, documented to our period.

Armory:
Or, an oriental dragon rampant azure, in chief an arrow fesswise reversed sable.

No conflicts found.


Katherine Noël de Lyon (NEW name, See RETURNS for Device)

Will not accept Major changes; Important – meaning, language (I want to keep it close to my legal name); Gender: female; no authenticity request; will NOT allow a holding name

Katherine – found in this spelling in “French Names from Paris, 1421, 1423 and 1438” http://heraldry.sca.org/names/french/paris1423.html by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (Sara L. Uckelman).

Noel – found in this spelling in “French Names from Paris, 1421, 1423 and 1438: Surnames” http://heraldry.sca.org/names/french/paris1423surnames.html by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (Sara L. Uckelman).

de – French locative article per SENA Appendix A

Lyon – found in Academy of St. Gabriel Report #2904 http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi/2904.txt by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (Sara L. Uckelman), which states that the form [de Lyon] is found in a 1446 census

The French name formation [given + byname + article + locative] is shown in Appendix A in SENA.


Margery Garret (NEW Badge #1, Name registered December 2002; See RETURNS for Badge #2)

Per fess embattled sable mullety argent, and gules, in base a crescent argent.

The online O&A shows the following entry: The following device associated with this name was registered in December of 2003 (via the West) and changed/released in July of 2012 (via the West): Per fess embattled sable mullety argent and gules, in base a crescent argent.

Submitter previously had this registered as her device, and would now like to register it as a badge. This badge appears to be clear of conflict. Submitter will be encouraged to make the embattled line deeper and fewer



Marjorie de ffeyrefeld (NEW Badge; Name registered October 2000)

Fieldless, a lozenge per pale sable and argent.

No conflicts found.



Muirgel ingen Gáethíne (RESUB device to Kingdom; Name submitted West LoI July 2015)

Or, three chevronels braced and on a chief sable, three calamarie Or.

Her previous submission, Or, on a chief sable three calamarie Or was returned at Kingdom for conflict with Graham, Duke of Montrose, registered in December of 1994 (via Laurel) Or, on a chief sable three escallops Or. There is only one CD for change of type of tertiaries. The addition of the chevronels clears this conflict.

No conflicts found.



Niðbjorg Hrafnagil (RESUB name to Kingdom, see RETURNS for device)

Unmarked changes boxes; Important – meaning; Gender: female; Authenticity request – language and/or culture: “Nordic”

Niðbjorg – Found in Bassi, p. 13

Hrafnagil –This is a constructed locative surname “hrafn” = raven, “hrafna” stated to be the genitive plural of hrafn; “gil” = ravine or gully; “Raven’s gully.” Hrafn- is found in Bassi, p. 11. Cleasby and Vigfusson’s Icelandic Dictionary, p. 199, shows several variations with the formation [Name-gil]. According to Cleasby and Vigfusson, “?gja” is the term for a chasm that is dry at the bottom or has only stagnant water, while “-gil” is the term for a chasm with a stream at the bottom. There was a place named Hrafnagja in Iceland, but Latimer could find no date for this. It is along one side of the wide rift between the continental plates at the north end of the lake, where the Althing was held [Johnston-Lavis, Scottish Geographical Magazine 1895 p. 459]. It is shown on maps of Thingvellir National Park, on the east side of the land at the north end of the lake. Additionally, we find: “Hrafnagil was, in ancient times, a chieftain's estate and the site of a church”, http://www.northiceland.is/en/what-to-see-do/towns/hrafnagil. Icelandic is one of the languages which has seen very little change from our period to present day, so the current-use name of the town is likely a plausible period place name.

Old Norse/Old Icelandic name formation [given + locative byname] is discussed in “The Bynames of the Viking Age Runic Inscriptions” by Lindorm Eriksson (Christer Romson).

This submitter has three prior name and device submissions to Kingdom which were returned. Her first name submission, “Nia McGhill” (Nov. 2003) was returned for lack of documentation of the given name, and it was noted at that time that the byname would be “MacGill” since we did not then (and still do not) register the scribal abbreviation “Mc.” Her next submitted name, “Nia McGhille” (April 2005) was also returned; “Nia” can only be documented as a given name once in our period, and it is a male name; and the S. Gabriel reports which were cited in support of “McGhille” actually only support bynames in the form <mac Gille Xyz> where the <Xyz> is integral to the byname formation. Her third name submission, “Niamh MacGiollarnath” (February 2007) was returned as unregisterable as requested (she requested a specifically Irish name); “Niamh” is documented as a modern form of “Niam” in OCM, so might be acceptable; but the submitted byname, if treated as Gaelic, cannot be registered with the feminine given name; the closest registerable name that could be documented was from Black, Mac an ghoill, or also Macgilvernock, which are both Scots, not Irish. The submitted byname could not be documented at all; since the device was returned, the name was also returned so that the submitter could decide what she wanted. This current submission is Scandinavian, not Irish/Scots/Gaelic, and so avoids all of the questions posed in the prior returns.


Safiya bint Zakariya al-Tayyib (NEW name, NEW device)

Unmarked changes boxes; Unmarked Important boxes; Gender: female; no authenticity request

This name and the formation are all found in “Period Arabic Names and Naming Practices” by Da'ud ibn Auda (David B. Appleton) http://heraldry.sca.org/names/arabic-naming2.htm.

Safiya – feminine given name (ism) translating to Sophia.

bint – patronymic/pedigree (nasab) article “daughter of”

Zakariya – masculine ism translating to Zacharias; Da’ud shows this name as <Zakariya’>.

al-Tayyib – descriptive laqab meaning “the good.” In this case, Zacharias is “the Good”, not Safiya.

The Arabic name formation [ism + nasab article + pat. ism (nasab) + laqab of pat. ism] is shown in “Period Arabic Names and Naming Practices” – see <Ahmad ibn Sa’id al-Bahili>

Armory:
Purpure, a needle palewise threaded, and on a chief Or two mullets of eight points purpure.

No conflict found.


Thora in vefara (NEW name)

Changes boxes unmarked; Important – Meaning: weaver; Gender: female; no authenticity request

Thora – found on p. 16 of Bassi as Þóra, “Thora” is the simplified Old Norse form, as allowed in the December 2012 LoAR Cover Letter.

(in) vefara – “vefari” meaning “a weaver” appears on p. 688 of “An Icelandic-English Dictionary” by Richard Cleasby and Gudbrand Vigfusson http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~kurisuto/germanic/oi_cleasbyvigfusson_about.html; as “vefari” is masculine, the –i ending has been changed to the feminine –a.

The Old Norse/Old Icelandic name formation [given + “in” + occupational byname] is shown in “Viking Bynames found in the Landnámabók” by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (Sara L. Uckelman) http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/vikbynames.html, which states, in part, "…While most of the bynames are used by both men and women, there are a few that take different forms depending on the gender. A good way to tell the difference is that the feminine forms will use the definite article 'in' rather than 'inn', and will end in -a instead of -i, generally." Multiple instances of occupational bynames, both masculine and feminine, are shown. Examples include gyðja (priestess), in ljosa (nurse, midwife), goði (priest), smiðr (smith). A few include the 'in' or 'inn' article.


Thyri of Vakkerfjell (NEW name, NEW device)

Will not accept Major or Minor changes; No “Important” boxes marked; Gender: female; no authenticity request

Thyri – found in “English and Norse Documents Relating to the Reign of Ethelred the Unready” by Margaret Ashdown, in the Index of Personal Names http://assets.cambridge.org/97811074/19230/index/9781107419230_index.pdf, p. 274.

of – locative article required by “SCA placename” rule

Vakkerfjell – registered name of a Shire in the Kingdom of the West (May 1983)

The name formation [given + anglicized locative article + SCA locative byname] is appropriate for names formed using the Branch Name Allowance, as shown in PN1.B.2.f in SENA.

Armory:
Per saltire gules and sable, two wolves combatant and a bordure Or.

No conflicts found.



Treásach Þjóðhaga (NEW name, NEW device)

Will not accept Major changes; No “Important” boxes marked; Gender: female; no authenticity request

Treásach –Legal name allowance (SENA PN1.B.2.e), Treasach is submitter’s legal given name per submitted copy of her Driver License. This name was likely originally “Tressach,” a masculine Old/Middle Irish Gaelic given name dating to 884-969AD.

Þjóðhaga – meaning “great artist, master craftsman” appears on p. 739 of “An Icelandic-English Dictionary” by Richard Cleasby and Gudbrand Vigfusson http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~kurisuto/germanic/oi_cleasbyvigfusson_about.html; as “Þjóð-hagi” is masculine, the –i ending has been changed to the feminine –a.

Forming this name from Old/Middle Irish Gaelic and Old Icelandic is not permitted per SENA Appendix A; however, use of the legal name allowance for the given name allows us to treat “Treasach” as “neutral in language and time” (SENA PN2.C.2.d). The Old Norse/Old Icelandic descriptive byname formation is shown in “Viking Bynames found in the Landnámabók” by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (Sara L. Uckelman) http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/vikbynames.html, which states, in part, “…While most of the bynames are used by both men and women, there are a few that take different forms depending on the gender. A good way to tell the difference is that the feminine forms will use the definite article in rather than inn, and will end in a instead of i, generally.” Multiple instances of descriptive (functional, not physical) bynames, both masculine and feminine, are shown. Examples include gigja (eloquent lawyer), inn stórh?ggvi (great slasher), harðfari (fast traveller), herkja (one who exerts himself utterly). A few include the “in” or “inn” article, but most do not.

Armory:
Quarterly Or and barry wavy argent and azure, overall a drakkar purpure.

No conflicts found.


William Whyte (NEW name, NEW device)

Will not accept Major changes; Important – Sound: wil-yum white; Gender: male; no authenticity request

William – documented in English in this spelling in the 14th century in “English Names from Pre-1600 Brass Inscriptions” by Julian Goodwyn (Janell K. Lovelace), edited by Arval Benicoeur (Josh Mittleman) [http://heraldry.sca.org/names/brasses/men.html] and 16th century in “Names found in the Berkeley Hundred Court Rolls” by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (Sara L. Friedemann) http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/berkeley100.html. Latimer notes that Withycombe dates its use in England to the 11th century when William the Conquerer made himself king and says from then on it has held its place as one of the commonest men’s names.

Whyte – found in this spelling on “An Index to the 1332 Lay Subsidy Rolls for Lincolnshire, England” by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (Kathleen M. O'Brien) http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/LincLSR/BynW.html. Also found in Reaney & Wilson, p. 486 sn. White: Walter le Whyte, 1284.

The English name formation [given + byname] is shown in Appendix A in SENA.

“William Whytemore” is registered (December 2006, East). According to SENA [PN.3.C.2], the removal of a syllable makes two names substantially different in sound, so this submission should be clear of conflict.

Armory:
Argent, a chevron purpure, overall a rapier sable.

No conflicts found.


RETURNS

Caitilin Cameron (RESUB name, RESUB device RETURNED)

Will not accept Major changes; Important – Sound (no sound noted); Gender: female; no authenticity request

Caitilin - http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Caitilin.shtml" target=_blank>http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Caitilin.shtml; found in OC&M dated from 1411 through 1592

Cameron – Found in Black, “Surnames of Scotland” p. 128; John Cameron, dated to 1434.

The Scots name formation [given + byname] is shown in the citation from Black, above.

Her original submission was Katelin Cameron. The return from May 2014 states:

Commenters questioned if this name conflicted with the registered Catherine Cameron. Precedent states:
Conflict with the registered name Caitlin of Greenwood. When pronounced correctly, the only difference in sound is the very minor difference between an "r" and an "l" and sometimes the difference between a "t" and a "th". Neither change is sufficient difference. [Catharine Grenewode¸ 01/00, R-Atlantia]
The long a doesn't appear in English until after our period, so the period pronunciations in English are Cat-uh-leen/Ket-uh-leen vs. Cath-uh-reen. Under this pronunciation, the name is clear under SENA PN.3.C.1, Changes to Two Syllables. In modern English, it would be Cate-lin vs. Cath-er-in. Under this pronunciation, the name is clear under SENA PN.3.C.2, Substantial Change to One Syllable.

Although these names would be clear in period and modern English/Scots, Catherine can be pronounced Cat-uh-reen in languages like French, with the h being silent or nearly so. And although one could argue that only pronunciations from the English regional language group should be considered, this is not the case under PN.3.C of SENA:

To be clear of identity conflict, two names must be substantially different in both sound and appearance. Because conflict is a modern concept, we consider matters such as meaning, language, etymological origin, etc. to be irrelevant for conflict. Only sound and appearance are considered for difference. Thus, the Latinized form of a name may be clear of conflict with the vernacular form. While we do not go out of our way to consider variant pronunciations, we do consider important period and modern pronunciations of name elements.
Therefore, as there is only a single syllable of difference in sound between Katelin and Catherine under this pronunciation, this name conflicts with Catherine Cameron and must be returned.
This name is STILL in conflict with Catherine Cameron under the argument presented in the LoAR. There are insufficient countable differences between “Katelin”, “Caitilin” and “Catherine.” We strongly suggest that the submitter add an additional element, such as a locative (of Cynagua) or a clan affiliation or patronymic article. There is a form of Cameron – Gillacameroin – which is dated in Black’s Surnames of Scotland to 1467; this would clear the conflict by the addition of another syllable. Armory:
Purpure, a tiger rampant to sinister argent marked sable, a bordure embattled ermine.

In the return on the LoAR of May 2014, Laurel noted: “This device is returned for conflict with the device of Thomas Dyne, Per pale azure and vert, a natural tiger salient contourny argent marked sable, a bordure embattled argent. There is a DC for the change of field, but nothing else. There is a step from period practice for the use of a natural tiger.”

This submission clears the called conflict: one DC for the field tincture change (azure and vert to purpure), and one DC for the bordure tincture change (argent to ermine).

Unfortunately, the new design is in conflict with Tyra of Rivenwood Tower, registered August of 1990 (via the Middle): Purpure, a domestic cat rampant to sinister argent within a bordure ermine. There is one CD for the change of the plain-line bordure to embattled. A domestic cat and a tiger are not considered to have any difference, even with the sable markings on the tiger.


Camshron Mac GilleFinnan (NEW name & NEW device RETURNED (no given name – could not send Device on))

Changes boxes unmarked; Important – Language (none noted); Gender: male; Authenticity request for “early 15th century Scottish Gaelic”

Submitter will accept a very common Scots Gaelic given name such as Ihan if we are unable to register Camshron as his given name; i.e. “Ihan Camshron Mac GilleFinnan.” Though meaning is not marked on his form, his documentation notes that he would accept (and I infer is looking for) a name like “[Jon] The crooked nosed son of the follower of St. Finnan” with the Jon left off if possible.

Latimer notes: [John] doesn’t seem to have been a very common Scots Gaelic given name. This is not surprising when you realize that it’s not Gaelic and its usage comes from a translation of the Scots [Ian] into Gaelic as [Iain]. For a very common Scots Gaelic name, [Fergus] or [Domnall] would be better choices. I found no documentation for [Ihan] as a variant Gaelic spelling.

Camshron – documented in St. Gabriel Report #1131 as the Gaelic form of the surname “Cameron” and originally having the meaning “wry or hook nose.”  [Camshron] isn’t actually a Gaelic form of [Cameron]. Rather, it is a Gaelic nickname that eventually became confused with [Cameron] and devolved to that spelling. This reference does NOT document the use of [Camshron] as a given name, nor does any of the information in Black.

[Camshron] is cited in Black on page 128 under the header [Cameron] as the Gaelic origin of some uses of [Cameron]. There is no indication that either Camshron or Cameron were used as given names in our period in Ireland or Scotland.

Mac – clan or patronymic article

GilleFinnan – Submitter documents this as the precursor to the MacLennan clan name; at http://genforum.geneaology.com/mclennan/messages/8.html we find - Gaelic “Mac Gill Innein” or “Mac Gill Fhinnein” = son of the servant of Saint Finnan.

According to Woulfe, [Finnian] was the name of several Irish saints. Ó Corrain and McGuire list [Finnán = Fionnán] on p. 101. They state that this is a diminutive of [Finn] and mention a St. Finnán, bishop of Moville. From this comes the surname Ó Fionnáin. Their citation of [Finnán] is undated.

Woulfe has a long, long list of names derived from <Mac Giolla “Saint’s Name”>. Among these, he lists [Mac Giolla Fhinnéin], but does not include the submitter’s spelling. All of these are undated.

At [http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/tangwystyl/lateirish/ormond-given.html#Given], Tangwystyl lists the given name [Giolla-Fionnain], spelled [Gyllfynnan] in the manuscript. The full citation for the article is “Names and Naming Practices in the Red Book of Ormond (Ireland 14th Century), Given Names,” by Heather Rose Jones  (Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn). However, based on other sources, [Finnian] and [Fionnain] appear to be different names.

It would be very helpful if the submitter would write out, in the English equivalents, exactly what he wants his name to mean. We are guessing he wants:

<generic masculine Scots given name Fxxx> <son of><another generic masculine Scots given name Dyyy><the servant of Saint Finnán ><of clan> <Cameron ie hook-nosed> … whose nickname would end up something like “Camshron <Dyyy>” or “Camshron Mac<Dyyy>”. Either way, the naming practice noted above was not for USE names; it was for census documents and the like.

Armory:
Gules, a bend and in sinister canton a Maltese cross argent.

No conflict found, but we are unable to send the armory on to Laurel without a name submission.


Charles van den Haag (NEW badge RETURNED; NEW name device sent on to Laurel 9/2015)

Fieldless, a gurges gules.

Gurges cannot be displayed on a fieldless badge because the edge of a gurges is determined by the edge of the field, and fieldless has no edges. SENA A.3.A.2 states: “Fieldless Designs: We categorize these as badges; devices must have a field. All the charges in these designs must touch one another to create a single self-contained design. Fieldless designs must follow all other style rules. They must include a primary charge, and may also include secondary, overall, or tertiary charge groups. Additionally, no charges may be used that are defined in terms of the field or its outline, such as a bordure, chief, or an ordinary that isn't couped.” If this were submitted on Argent, it would be clear of conflict.


Donnubán se Reade (NEW device RETURNED; NEW Name sent on to Laurel 9/2015)

Quarterly argent and azure a fret gules.

This device is in conflict with Iago ab Adam, “Ermine, fretty gules” (registered August 2000 via AnTir); there is one CD for the field change, but there is no difference in “a fret” and “fretty” in period usage. We can attempt to get permission to conflict from Iago ab Adam; we checked other fret tinctures and reversing the azure and gules, and all designs had conflicts or very poor contrast.


Fionnguala Bean MhicFinnan (NEW name and device RETURNED)

Unmarked changes boxes; Important – Language (none noted); Gender: female; Authenticity requested: early 15th century Gaelic Irish/Scot

Fionnguala - This spelling found in "Index of Names in Irish Annals: Fionnghuala" by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (Kathleen M. O'Brien) http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Fionnghuala.shtml under Fionnguala inghen Maghnais Uí Concobhair, dated 1306-1310.

Bean Mhic - (submitter believes this to mean "daughter in law of") A similar formation can be found in "Index of Names in Irish Annals: Fionnghuala" by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (Kathleen M. O'Brien) "Finnghuala, ingein Ui Cheallaigh, .i. bean Mic Uilliam Burc". This scribal notation actually shows a census or genealogical entry, and is not reflective of the name this person used for day to day matters. Therefore, it is helpful for documenting spelling, but not formation.

As far as Latimer could see from a brief scan through women's names elsewhere in the article, a woman was first identified as the daughter of somebody (who might be the son of somebody), and then, occasionally, as the wife of somebody (who might be the son of somebody). We did not find any documentation for this exact form. “Bean” is usually used with the husband’s WHOLE name, or the husband’s GIVEN name only.

Finnan - It is possible this is meant to reference the precursor to the MacLennan clan name; at http://genforum.geneaology.com/mclennan/messages/8.html - Gaelic"Mac Gill Innein" or "Mac Gill Fhinnein" = son of the servant of Saint Finnan; this name seems to mean the [wife of] "the son OF Finnan" not the [wife of] "the son of the servant of Saint Finnan."

According to Woulfe, [Finnian] was the name of several Irish saints. Ó Corrain and McGuire list [Finnán = Fionnán] on p. 101. They state that this is a diminutive of [Finn] and mention a St. Finnán, bishop of Moville. From this came the surname Ó Fionnáin. Their citation of [Finnán] is undated. Latimer can't find anything showing that anyone other than saints used the name [Finnán].

Armory:
Quarterly purpure and argent, a cross crosslet fitchy and a tower purpure.

Since we are returning the name for clarification of what the submitter wants, we are returning the armory as well. SENA A.6.F discusses the appearance of marshalling in some detail. Placing two different charges in the argent quarters of the device seems to fit the description of “marshaled arms”, although the two purpure, uncharged quarters might make the design registerable. Two purple towers would be more period style and would solve the “appearance of marshalling” problem; if the submitter really wants the crosses, she could put them on the towers.


Hans Shaffer (Device resub to Kingdom, name registered November 2014) RETURNED

Per bend sable and vert, a three-headed talbot rampant to sinister argent.

His first submission, Per bend sinister embattled vert and sable, a three-headed talbot rampant to sinister, one head reguardant, argent, was returned for redrawing (the center head was to sinister instead of affront) and for conflict with Judith Jehane di Ettore (Per bend sinister gules and sable a fox rampant to sinister argent). His second submission, Per bend sinister vert and sable, a three-headed talbot rampant to sinister argent, was drawn with the center head correctly positioned, but the per bend sinister division left the conflict with Judith unaddressed. Judith has since supplied a Letter of Permission to Conflict This submission divides the field per bend, but the submitter has now reversed the field colors, so it will need a full conflict check.

Unfortunately, we have another conflict. Dorcas Dorcadas: The following device was registered in September of 1973 and reblazoned in May of 2010 (via the West): Sable, a three-headed hound rampant contourny, one head reguardant, argent. Since this device was originally registered in 1973, and Dorcas is known to have moved away from the West decades ago, no letter of permission is forthcoming. We deeply regret that this conflict was not discovered during the submitter’s long and persistent submission process.

We have no suggestions regarding changes to clear this conflict, without knowing submitter’s preferences for additions to the design. Any change keeping these design elements will need to be an added charge (we would recommend a peripheral ordinary) and would then require additional conflict checking.


Katherine Noël de Lyon (NEW device RETURNED; Name sent on to Laurel 9/2015)

Azure, a tiger sejant erect to sinister Or marked Sable and a lyon sejant Or, forepaws touching.

SENA A.3.D.1 Clarity of charge groups, states, “Having identical types of charges in multiple charge groups on the field blurs the distinction between charge groups. Thus, it is not allowed, except for cotises and endorses around an ordinary. Having two close variants of a charge in a design is confusing and makes the charge groups difficult to identify. Thus, two charges or depictions of charges that are artistic variants of one another or that otherwise are considered to have less than a distinct change (DC) between them are not allowed in a single armorial design. (SENA A.5 defines distinct changes in more detail.) This is true even if one charge is on the field and the other charge is on another charge. In precedent, this is sometimes referred to as 'sword and dagger'.

For example, both Azure, a lion and a catamount combatant Or and Azure, a lion between three catamounts Or are not registerable, because we do not consider there to be a distinct change between a lion and a catamountAzure, a hound and on a chief Or a wolf sable is not registerable, because we do not consider there to be a distinct change between a hound and a wolfSable, a sword and a dagger in saltire proper is not registerable, nor is Sable, a rapier between six daggers Or, because we do not consider there to be a distinct change among any forms of swords, including daggers.”

Additionally, this design is in conflict with Jerimia von Braun, registered August 1979 (via Atenveldt) and reblazoned in November 1981 (via Atenveldt), “Azure, two domestic cats sejant respectant, tails crossed in saltire Or.” Also, heraldic animals don’t play patty-cake; if the submitter wants two (either IDENTICAL or COMPLETELY DIFFERENT) animals seated and facing each other with the paw raised, please draw them on the forms such that they are not touching.


Margery Garret (2nd Badge RETURNED, 1st BADGE sent on to Laurel)

Argent, on a pale vert between two paw prints sable, a tower Or charged with a heart gules.

Complexity count of NINE (SENA A.3.E.2 generates a Step from Period Practice - see below), Paws are also SFPP, so just for those two things, this must be returned. Also, layer count of FOUR – “…Charges on tertiary charges are known as quaternary charges and are not allowed, unless documented as an Individually Attested Pattern.” (SENA Appendix I.C.).

Ref. SENA A.3.E.2 “We require that any submission not exceed a certain "complexity count," measured by adding the number of types of charges to the number of tinctures. Items with a complexity count of eight or less receive no penalty for complexity from this rule. … An item with a complexity count of nine or higher that follows a period pattern of charges and tinctures may be registered, but may need to be documented as an Individually Attested Pattern.”


Niðbjorg Hrafnagil (RESUB device RETURNED – Name sent on to Laurel)

Azure, on a pale argent three birds migrant sable.

This current device submission is a complete redesign. See below for submitter’s prior designs.

We find a conflict with Jakob Krahe, registered in February of 2014 (via AEthelmearc), Azure, on a pale argent a crow displayed facing to sinister sable distilling four gouttes de sang. We can attempt to get a LoPtC, or the tincture of the birds could be changed to all azure or all gules, and that would clear this conflict (number and color of tertiary charges is sufficient, per SENA A.5.G.). With the wings drawn as submitted, these birds would still have the “raven” look. We do suggest that they be drawn a little bigger, and more evenly spaced on the pale (this drawing has them “pushed” up toward the top of the picture).

Submitter’s first device design, Tierced per pall gules, Or and sable, an “Irish wolf” maintaining a sword in it’s mouth argent, a wheel sable, and a harp Or. The design was returned because the “wolf” was not recognizable as such on the submitted emblazon AND the arrangement was in violation of the RfS in place at that time.

Her second device design, Per pall gules, Or and sable, in chief a wolf statant argent, in dexter a wagon wheel sable, and in sinister a harp Or cleared up the unidentifiability problem, but left the “slot machine” rule violation (RfS VIII(1)(a) three or more different charges should not be used in the same group).

Her third device submission had three alternate designs. The first, Sable, in canton a phoenix Or and a dexter gore gules, violates the rule of tincture (red gore, black field); her second alternate, Gules, vetu sable fimbriated Or, a phoenix Or was not accepted under RfS because Vetu may not be fimbriated. Her third alternate, Per chevron rayonny sable and gules, in base a phoenix Or was in conflict with the device of Harald Haakonson (Jan. 1973): Per chevron argent and vert, in base a phoenix Or.


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