Minutes of the May, 2015 Heralds Meeting

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MINUTES OF THE MONTHLY MEETING – May 17, 2015 (11:15 am to 4:45 pm)

The meeting was held at Green Crown’s home. In general, all future meetings will be held at Green Crown’s home (564 Broadmoor Blvd., San Leandro, CA 94577; email greencrownwest@yahoo.com for directions).

ATTENDEES:
Frederick of Holland, Vesper; Krysta of Starfall, Green Crown; Aasa Thorvaldsdottir, Seawolf; Hirsch von Henford, Golem; eilis o’Boirne, Banner; Dafydd Waleis, Nebuly P. and CoH Exchequer; Gwenhwyfaer ferch Gwilym, PaL; Moira O’Connor, PaL; Aine inghean Tuathail, PE; Edith of Swansdale, Cornet; Margaret Pye, Cornet.

COLLEGE OF HERALDS MEETINGS
Heralds’ Meetings for 2015: July 12, September 20, November 15 (the day after Herald’s Collegium), January 3, 2016 (tentative based on 12th Night). Meetings begin at 11AM, with walk-in processing no later than 10:30AM. “Road show” meetings, if any, will be announced well in advance.

Walk-in submissions may be held over until the following meeting at the discretion of Matins.

We are conducting some preliminary name research through the West Kingdom heraldic consultation mailing list wkheralds_consults@yahoogroups.com. This list is open to all those interested in West Kingdom book heraldry: both names and devices, and either to contribute or to ask questions. To join the list, please subscribe through Yahoo or at wkheralds_consults-subscribe@yahoogroups.com. If you subscribe by e-mail, you can complete the process by replying to the confirmation e-mail; it is not necessary to log in to Yahoo. Please note that initial posts are moderated and thus may not appear on the list immediately.


REPORTS

Vesper: Roster letters have gone out; most have returned. Laurel will be starting Skype check-ins with all Principal heralds. Vesper will ask senior heralds for reports so that he can have an informed conversation with Laurel. A new sub-account on the West CoH “books” will be established for Golden Playne by Daffyd per Vesper’s direction.

Seawolf: Investiture happened; awards happened and will be reported today; her deputy Daffyd rocks, and we have a new Prince and Princess.

Sable Swan: not present (no report)

Stellanordica: not present (no report)

Exchequer: We have money; the signature card still needs to be fixed. Most likely this will happen at the June Mists Province meeting, where everyone who needs to be present most easily can be.

Matins (vacant - Green Crown reporting): Submissions processing and review of commentary on West Kingdom submissions on OSCAR continue.

Green Crown: Aine inghean Tuathail is working with me to structure a clear process document for the Matins Office regarding submissions processing and client service strategies. I appreciate her input and willingness to learn the job.

Banner: People were really happy with the manner of inclusion for the Order of Defense ceremony. Banner needs a volunteer to cover courts at June Crown because Banner will be running the Crucible-List.

Baldric: not present (no report)

Brachet: not present (no report)

Greencloak: not present (no report)

Latimer: Astrid made comments on all of our submitted names for this meeting. We thank her for her continued participation in the submission process. We thank Edith for driving books around.

Golem: Ceremonies updated, including Order of Defense (and all of the other polling Peerage Orders); updates for the Mists also done.


ANNOUNCEMENTS / Other Business

Laurel requires now 0 (zero) paper submissions – we need only one copy and Matins doesn’t mail anything to Laurel, just sends scans. Effective immediately we will only require from submitters:

Name submission: one copy and documentation
Device submission: one line drawing, one colored drawing, with documentation if needed
Badge submission: one line drawing, one colored drawing, documentation as needed
Money: $10 for name+device or name+badge, $6 for individual submissions.

Colored submissions are still required to be hand colored using markers, not crayons or pencils, and must be colored with “quality markers” so colors don’t change; we encourage the use of Crayola Classic markers. If the submission is not colored in true colors, the College is required to send it back.

SUBMISSIONS GUIDELINES

GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

VOICE HERALDRY: Greencloak will continue to hold voice heraldry training sessions at the beginning of events to encourage involvement at the event.

MAILING LIST: The West Kingdom College of Heralds has a mailing list for internal communication. Any herald is welcome to join by request. To join the list, please subscribe at wkheralds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com.

ELECTRONIC RESOURCES: Many interesting heraldic links can be found through the SCA Heraldry web page at http://www.sca.org/heraldry, including the Laurel home page, the on-line Armorial and Ordinary (with search capabilities) and The Academy of St. Gabriel (an onomastic and heraldic consultation service). The West Kingdom Heraldry site and the West Kingdom Awards List can be accessed through the West Kingdom site, http://www.westkingdom.org. Heraldic queries may also be addressed to Vesper at herald@westkingdom.org -- answers may take a few days.

West Kingdom College of Heralds Minutes are published on the web. They may be read at or printed from the heralds' website at http://heralds.westkingdom.org/Minutes.htm.

BRACHET MEETINGS
The office of Brachet Herald was filled as of the September meeting; no commenting meetings are being held, but Brachet is brainstorming to try to do e-meetings. More news soon.


EXCERPTS FROM THE LOARS

The cover letters, acceptances and returns for the past can be found at http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/. If you are interested in responding to some of the calls for commentary put out by the Laurel Sovereign of Arms, please be sure to visit the site.

Special April 2015 LoAR (printed April 5, 2015) (No West LoI)

Cover Letter

From Laurel: Order of Defense

The Order of Defense will be opened on May 1, 2015. This is the first peerage created since 1972. Registration and protection of regalia for peerage orders was formalized in 1982. Since that time the submissions process has become standardized and documented. As no new peerage orders were submitted until this year, the submissions process did not include a formal procedure for the submission of items for new peerage orders.

To ensure that the items submitted for this peerage received the input, review, and consideration standard for all submissions, calls for comments were issued when the Additional Peerage Exploratory Committee (APEC) and Additional Peerage Review Committee (APRC) reports were released. The Board of Directors submitted these items to Laurel after their February conference call meeting. These items were included in a Letter of Intent issued by Laurel on February 2, 2015, which began the official College of Arms commentary period for these items.

In consultation with and by direction of the Board, Laurel suspended the provisions of the Administrative Handbook VIII.A related to the scheduling of Letters of Intent in order that these items could be considered and ruled on before members were inducted into this peerage. Due to the timing of the Letter of Intent containing these items, the sole effect of waiving this provision was to reduce the commentary period for these items by a single day. The College of Arms commentary period covers two months after a Letter of Intent is issued. As most Letters of Intent are issued at the end of a month, the commentary period usually averages two months and a day or so more. A Letter of Intent issued on February 1st is counted as a January Letter of Intent for the purposes of the College of Arms commentary period and commentary closes for January Letters of Intent on March 31st. Thus the commentary period was only one day shorter than it would have been if the it had been issued on February 1st.

We would like to thank everyone for the diverse commentary received on these important items during both the calls for comments and the College of Arms commentary period. Commentary is critical to providing due consideration for all submissions and to maintaining balances in our submissions process. Several concerns were voiced in commentary and are addressed in the rulings on these items. As the last peerage creation predates our formalized rules systems, we have little precedent that fully applies to these situation. This made the commentary provided that much more critical as we were largely working without a road map in these decisions. In this exceptional case, we strove to apply the rules in good fashion while preserving the ability to add additional peerage items both fairly and without infringing upon the registered names and armory of individuals and groups. We believe that these rulings are the best compromise between the structure of The Standards for Evaluation of Names and Armory and the spirit of the Society in recognizing excellence.

The Sovereigns would like to offer our thanks not only to all of those who gave comments, but also to those heralds who have assisted with the accelerated timeline of making these items available for consideration: Non Scripta, Temperaunce, Aldyrne, Palimpsest, and Ogress. Without their hard work, we would not have been able to meet the timeline requested by the Board.

From Laurel: On the style for members of the Order of Defense

In her ruling on the order name, Pelican wrote:

"We must note that this order name is deliberately reminiscent of the historical Company of the Masters of Defence (commonly known as the London Masters of Defence). The phrase, Master of Defence, is also found in the writings of Jean-Pierre Camus: "An excellent Master of defence, with whom no man will fight..for feare of his dexterity" (1639 English translation, OED). We can think of no better description for companions of this new order."

We note the following acceptable styles for members of the Order: X, Master of the Order of Defense, and X, Master of Defense. On the question of post-nomial abbreviations (the practice of putting initials for awards behind one's name), we decline to specify an abbreviation as this practice is post-period.

From Laurel: Comments sought

1) During the commentary period for the badge of the Order of Defense, there was some concern about appropriately protecting the badge from presumption.

Under SENA we protect from presumption both charges (a pelican in its piety, a white belt) and motifs (two straight trumpets in saltire). We ask the College whether the motif utilized in the badge for the Order of Defense should be protected from presumption.

2) With the exception of the Order of the Laurel, members of peerage orders may register motifs restricted to their orders as part of their armory. We request discussion of whether the motif for the Order of Defense should be registerable in the armory of members of the Order. Is this ability something the members of the order would desire? Though it is a practice in the Society (the popularity of which varies by kingdom) it is not a period practice. We would invite members of this order to voice their thoughts on this issue. We again thank the members of the Order of the Laurel for their contributions to the discussion of this issue for their order in 2008. It was incredibly helpful and insightful. Any member of the Order of Defense who wishes to provide commentary for consideration may send it via their kingdom's Principal Herald who will post it to the commentary area within OSCAR.

Comments will be solicited following the release of this LoAR, and will be open until August 31, 2015.

From Laurel: Additional Badges for the Order of Defense

During the commentary period, it was noted that some of the announced but not-yet-inducted members of the Order had voiced a desire for additional or different badge options.

We very much respect the ability of each Order to define themselves, and acknowledge that new members may have a very different idea of what they would like to see as badges and regalia for their order. While Laurel has the authority to fully regulate regalia for the peerage orders, the Society itself is the owner of any badges for Society-wide offices and orders. Thus, any new submissions for any peerage order would need to be submitted by the Board acting on behalf of the Society. Such submissions would include any item to be registered for use by that peerage including (but not limited to) additional badges, modifications to current badges, or release of current badges.

Given this structure, Laurel advises that once the Order of Defense is sufficiently birthed in each kingdom, the membership of the Order should propose any new armory to the Board of Directors for submission to Laurel. We remind the Order members that such armory must be clear of conflict and otherwise registerable.

Laurel Acceptances - Special April LoAR

Society for Creative Anachronism. Order name Order of Defense and badge. (Tinctureless) Three rapiers in pall inverted tips crossed.

Appearing in the Letter of Intent as Order of Defence, the preferred spelling is Order of Defense. The spellings defence and defense are used interchangeably in our period [see the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), s.v. defence]. We have changed the name to the desired spelling, with the caveat that both spellings are acceptable and can be used according to the desires of the kingdom and the individual companions of the order.

The order name was documented in the Letter of Intent using the pattern of naming orders after given names; in this case, Defence is an attested late period English surname, which can be used as a given name by precedent. The spelling Defense is also acceptable in this context.

However, this order name could also refer to a motto or desirable trait. Several order names of this sort are found in Juliana de Luna's article, "Medieval Secular Order Names" (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/OrderNames/index.shtml). Some orders named after desirable traits include Esperance "hope," Alte Minne "old love," grunen minne "fresh love." Additional examples include mottos or desirable traits as part of the name or as an alternate name for an order. The French Un collier de l'ordre A ma vie ("A collar of the order 'A ma vie'") refers to the Order of the Ermine by its motto. The Italian (here recorded in French) Chevaliers de la Compagnie du Saint Esperit au Droit Desir "Knights of the Company of the Holy Spirit of Right Desire" adds the desirable trait/motto "Right Desire" to the name of the patron saint. This kind of construction is often used for alternate names of the order, suggesting that at least in some contexts "Right Desire" is a name for the order. An order name like Defense is plausibly based on this pattern.

We must note that this order name is deliberately reminiscent of the historical Company of the Masters of Defence (commonly known as the London Masters of Defence). The phrase, Master of Defence, is also found in the writings of Jean-Pierre Camus: "An excellent Master of defence, with whom no man will fight..for feare of his dexterity" (1639 English translation, OED). We can think of no better description for companions of this new order.

Commenters questioned whether this order name is too generic to be registered because we have already designated several generic identifiers using the pattern X of Defense. Precedent states, "Names that fall into the generic identifier category are names that would reasonably be used by more than one group for common functions of the group" [December 2002 Cover Letter]. These identifiers are not technically registered, and are considered to be unprotected under IIIA1 of the Admin Handbook. Once this designation has been made, we do not limit the use of a generic identifier to any particular branch, and do not later register that item to a specific group. However, the names of the peerage orders are, by definition, intended for the use of the Society as a whole for common functions, and are not limited for use by one branch within the Society. The unique circumstances of this submission must take this into account.

As for whether this order name "conflicts" (for lack of a better term) with the generic identifiers already using the pattern X of Defense, we have a situation where such identifiers are technically not registered, but are treated as if they were. Although precedent has not made this clear, the entire generic identifier is a reference that is treated as a single unit (for example, in the Ordinary & Armorial). We do not consider it to have a separate designator and substantive element; rather, it is a stand-alone, multi-word designator. Therefore, the comparison in the present submission is between X of Defense and Order. Even if this were not the case, SENA NPN3E allows the registration of order names and names of households and affiliation with identical substantive elements but different designators. Thus, the potential "conflict" would not be an automatic bar to registration.

The phrase Academy of Defense is a historical term used by fencing schools, and is used by multiple SCA branches to refer to both educational events and fencing practices. A registration of Order of Defense would "superprotect" the term Defense under NPN4B2 of SENA, preventing further uses of X of Defense and limiting the use of Defense in both non-personal and personal names in future registrations:

Order and award names may not include the names of the peerage orders or overt references to famous knightly orders such as the Garter. Other types of non-personal names may only use such elements in contexts where no reference to the order is likely to be perceived by members of the order and the general populace.

However, in acknowledgement of the traditions of excellence that many branches have displayed in educating their populace on period rapier combat, the SCA Board of Directors has granted permission for the use of Academy of Defense or Academy of Defence by any branch, and only branches, in the future. We also explicitly grandfather the use of Royal Guild of Defense and Royal Guild of Fence by Lochac and the West, respectively, and rule that they will not be considered to presume upon the Order of Defense. New generic identifiers using X of Defense or a similar pattern will not be permitted going forward, per SENA NPN4B2.

The badge of the Order is registered as tinctureless. We recognize that it has been long-standing policy to not register tinctureless armory outside of Herald's Seals. However, given that the majority of the armory and regalia for the Peerage orders are tinctureless, we have afforded the same standing to the badge registered herein.

On the question of protection of this badge from presumption, we decline to rule at this time, wanting further comments from the College. See the Cover Letter for details.

Society for Creative Anachronism. Regalia for Order of Defense. (Fieldless) A white livery collar.

Submitted as (Fieldless) A white livery collar, bearing the badge of the Order of Defence, commentary indicated that requiring to recognize a specific badge hanging from the collar would decrease identifiability of the members of the order.

The white livery collar is registered and protected as regalia only. Similarly to the laurel wreath of the Order of the Laurel, it is not registered as a badge and cannot be registered on armory for the members of the Order of Defense.

In acknowledgement of the diverse forms and ornamentation that livery collars may possess, we decline to specify a type for the Order, just as we do not specify anything beyond a white belt for the Order of the Chivalry. In order to be considered regalia, the collar itself must be white.

Much like the superprotection of the white belt as regalia for the Order of Chivalry does not prevent the populace from wearing belts of other colors or metal, the superprotection of a white livery collar for the Order of Defense does not mean that members of the populace cannot wear livery collars of another color or metal livery collars, including those made of silver.

February 2015 LoAR (printed April 7, 2015) (West LoI 26 Nov, 2014)

Cover Letter

From Pelican: An Apology

In the discussion for the December 2014 acceptance of Akos Zekel's name, I completely botched Kolosvari Arpadne Julia's name. I apologize for the error.

From Pelican: English-German Lingual Mixes

In September 2014, we asked for commentary on whether to allow German and English to be mixed, adding them to Appendix C of SENA.

SENA PN2C2c states:

The name mixes name phrases from naming pools that can be documented as having been used together in the personal names of real people; for such combinations, the name phrases must be within 300 years of one another (and within 300 years of the documented examples). For such documentation, at least three period examples must be included in which the names can only be understood as combining from separate naming pools. The borrowing of names from one naming pool into another is not sufficient to demonstrate this, nor is the translation of names into another language.

Commenters provided examples that appeared to show some borrowing of German given names in late period England and vice versa. However, these examples do not provide clear evidence that separate naming pools and naming practices have been combined. Several of these names are saint's names, or were borrowed from classical literature or the Bible, and were excluded from the analysis of the data. Other examples are popular across Europe in our period, so it is hard to tell if they are coming exclusively from German or English.

In addition, we see the borrowing of given names, but not bynames. This can be shown in the marriage records provided in commentary. Both the brides and grooms have bynames from the same language, such as when Ludwig Tilbrok married Mary Archer in England, or when Andrew Weber married Margretha Von Leiningen (the daughter of a Johan Jochem Von Leiningen). We did not find evidence of English people borrowing German bynames, or vice versa.

Lastly, allowing this lingual mix means that its use would not be limited to Early Modern English and High German. We would also have to allow the combination of Middle English, Anglicized Irish, Welsh, or Scots with Low or High German from 1100 on. None of the examples presented in commentary showed how far these name patterns extended into the other languages, or that they appeared prior to the 16th century.

Therefore, we will not add the English-German lingual mix to Appendix C of SENA. However, we will allow the borrowing of given names from German into English and vice versa, in the context of the 16th and early 17th centuries. An English given name that is borrowed from German is considered to be English under Appendix C, and a German given name that is borrowed from English is considered to be German.

From Pelican: Proposed Changes to the Restricted Titles List - Scandinavian Titles

Orle collected information on period titles in Scandinavia for the purpose of making changes to the Restricted Titles List. The first of four Letters of Intent related to this proposal was due to be considered at this month's Pelican decision meeting. However, we will address all of them at the same time, at the May 2015 meeting, instead of considering each Letter of Intent separately. These items have been pushed in OSCAR to allow commentary to continue until the end of April.

From Wreath: No More Stone Hammers

This month a submission was examined that used stone throwing hammers. As we could not find any evidence that these were an artefact used within our period, this type of hammers will not be registerable, without documentation, after the August 2015 meeting.

West Acceptances - February LoAR

Angus Tyresson. Name and device. Per fess embattled argent and azure, two auroch's heads cabossed sable and a triskelion of spirals argent.

Submitted as Angus Tyresson, the byname was changed by kingdom because the name combined the English Angus with the post period Swedish Tyresson.

The form in the Letter of Intent, Tyreson was documented as a constructed patronym formed from the 17th century English given name Tyre. However, bynames were inherited in England in the 17th century, so a literal patronym is not considered likely. In commentary, Orle documented the name Tyreman ("servant of Tyre") in Reaney & Wilson, dated to the 14th and early 17th centuries. Therefore, Tyreson is plausible as a constructed Middle English patronym.

Reaney & Wilson, s.n. Dickson, has the 14th century byname Diksson/Dikson, showing that the -sson spelling is also found in England, although the double-s spelling is usually added to a genitive (possessive) form of the father's name (e.g., Dykonesson/Dicounesson, found s.n. Dickenson). Therefore, we are able to restore the byname to the submitted form.

We note that Angus is found in the Middle English Dictionary, dated to c.1400.

There is a step from period practice for the use of the triskelion of spirals.

Aodhán Ó Ceallaigh. Device. Per pale azure and sable semy of shamrocks argent, a pale wavy Or and in dexter two lions in pale argent.

Bárekr Úlfsson. Name.

Submitted as Bárek Úlfsson, the name was changed by kingdom to match the documentation that could be found.

This name does not conflict with the registered Eric Wolfson. Precedent states:

This name does not conflict with the registered Taran the Swift. The given names are different in precisely the same way that Harry and Mary are. SENA PN3C3 says "On a case by case basis, two-syllable names phrases may be eligible for this rule, such as Harry and Mary." While Taran is not a common given name, Aaron is. Therefore, a change to the first sound of the given name is sufficient to clear the conflict.

This does not mean that any change between two-syllable names would be sufficient to clear conflict under PN3C3. However, for given names, a change to the initial sound when at least one name is relatively common should be sufficient to clear conflict. [Aaron the Swift, March 2013, A-Æthelmearc]

Eric is a relatively common name, so Bárekr is clear under PN3C3 of SENA in the same way as in this precedent due to the change from Bár- to Er-. The name would also be clear under PN3C1 of SENA, as the first syllables of the given name and byname have been changed in sound and appearance.

Brodie MacMorrow. Name.

Submitted as Brodi McMorrow, the given name was changed in kingdom to Brodie to use the submitter's requested spelling. The byname was changed to MacMorrough to match the documentation that could be found and to expand the scribal abbreviation Mc- to Mac-.

Blue Tyger documented the byname McMorrow, dated to 1538, in Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII (Volume 13 Part 2, August-December 1538, pp. 211-227; https://www.british-history.ac.uk/letters-papers-hen8/vol13/no2/pp211-227). We have changed the name to Brodie MacMorrow in order to partially restore the name to the submitted form. Because we do not register scribal abbreviations, we are unable to restore the Mc-, and must retain the expanded form, Mac-.

Catrin Aderyn. Badge. (Fieldless) Two chevronels within and conjoined to an annulet argent.

Although reminiscent, this badge does not conflict with the logo of the brand Citroën.

Chiara Fornera. Name and device. Per fess nebuly sable and gules, two dragonflies and a rose argent.

This complex low-contrast line of division is identifiable here and thus registerable.

Please advise the submitter to draw the per fess line lower so it divides the field more equally.

Clarice Walker. Name change from holding name Katherine of Danegeld Tor.

Nice English name from the 13th to 17th centuries!

Farleigh de Grey. Name (see RETURNS for device).

Farleigh is the submitter's legal given name. It is also a byname found in late period England, so can be used as a given name by type. Therefore, the submitter need not rely on the legal name allowance.

The byname de Grey was documented in the Letter of Intent as an interpolated form. Commenters were also able to document the submitted spelling to 14th century England.

Fiora Lucia Lion. Name.

Godwin de Newbury. Name and device. Vert, on a bend sinister between two lions Or three trefoils palewise sable.

The submitter requested authenticity for 12th-13th century England.

The submitted given name, Godwin was not documented in the Letter of Intent. It is the expected vernacular form of the Latinized Godwinus, found in "Index of Names in the 1292 Subsidy Roll of London" by Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/english/london1292.html).

The submitted byname, de Newbury, was also not documented in the Letter of Intent, and commenters were unable to support this spelling. The closest spelling from the 12th or 13th century was de Neubury, dated to 1279. Examples of New- in place names from this time include Newbigging(e) (c.1230-50), Newbold (from 1230), New(e)degate (13th century), and Newhall (from c.1256), all found in Watts.

Although the submitted spellings were not attested, this name is consistent with spellings from the 13th century, and appears to meet the submitter's request for authenticity.

Grímr mac Lochlainn. Name and device. Quarterly azure and sable, a valknut and a bordure embattled argent.

Submitted as Grímr Mac Lo{.c}lainn, we do not register the punctum delens (the dot over the c in the byname):
By long precedent, we register Gaelic names using the h rather than the punctum delens. However, the submitter should feel free to use the punctum delens when writing his name.[Mícheál Buitilér, October 2010, A-An Tir]

In addition, the standard capitalization for the byname is mac Lochlainn. Although the submitted form is found in Gaelic in the raw data for Mari Elspeth nic Bryan's article, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Lochlainn.shtml), such examples only occur after 1100 and are not temporally compatible with the Old Norse given name.

Therefore, we have changed the name to Grímr mac Lochlainn in order to register this name.

There is a step from period practice for the use of a valknut.

Hosokawa Shigeyoshi. Name and device. Argent, a dragonfly sable within eight gouttes de larmes in annulo bases to center.

Both elements are dated to 1392, making this an excellent late 14th century Japanese name!

There is a step from period practice for charges in annulo not in their default palewise orientation.

Please advise the submitter to use the traditional wavy-tailed gouttes.

Jørgen Rasmussen. Name and device. Azure mullety, a calamarie argent.

Nice 16th century Danish name!

Lei Shou. Name.

Nice 2nd-3rd century Chinese name!

Liam MacCallum. Name and device. Per pale vert and azure, a lion contourny Or and in canton a crescent argent.

Liam is the submitter's legal given name. It is also a late 16th century English surname, which can be used as a given name. Therefore, the submitter need not rely upon the legal name allowance.

Magnus Mackintosh. Device. Per bend argent and gules, two martlets counterchanged sable and argent.

Malie inghean Chathail. Name and device. Argent, a phoenix gules and on a chief sable two decrescents Or.

Submitted as Malie inghean {.C}athail, we do not register the punctum delens (the dot over the c in the byname):
By long precedent, we register Gaelic names using the h rather than the punctum delens. However, the submitter should feel free to use the punctum delens when writing his name.[Mícheál Buitilér, October 2010, A-An Tir]

Therefore, we have changed the byname to inghean Chathail in order to register this name.

This name combines the Scots Malie and the Early Modern Irish Gaelic inghean Chathail. This is an acceptable lingual mix under Appendix C of SENA.

Margaret Pye. Name and device. Argent, a magpie close proper within an orle of pomegranates gules.

This exact name is found in 1591 in the FamilySearch Historical Records, making this an excellent 16th century English name!

Michael von Wolfsburg. Name.

Submitted as Michael Von Wolfburg, the submitter requested authenticity for a 12th-14th century German name. The byname was changed in kingdom to von Wolfsburg in order to meet this request.

Michael is dated to 1379 in "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia" by Talan Gwynek (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/bahlow_v.htm).

The byname is a constructed High German form of the Low German Wulfsborch. As it is not an attested spelling, we do not know if it meets the submitter's request for authenticity, but it is consistent with spellings from the 12th-14th centuries.

Nonna Treheyl of Kernow. Reblazon of badge. Per fess azure and vert, a fess indented to chief argent between a gyrfalcon sable and a stag at gaze ermine attired and unguled Or.

Blazoned when registered in March 1978 as Per fess azure and vert, a fess dancetty to chief argent, in chief a melanistic gyrfalcon proper and in base a stag statant at gaze ermine, attired and unguled Or, we are clarifying the tinctures of the birds.

Sitt an-Nis{a-}' al-Kar{a-}hisariya. Name and device. Argent, a coney rampant regardant azure between in fess a decrescent and a fleur-de-lys gules.

Submitted as Sitt an-Nis{a-} al-Karahisariya, the correct spelling and markings are Sitt an-Nis{a-}' al-Kar{a-}hisariya. We have changed the name to this form in order to register the name. We note that the casual transliteration Sitt an-Nisa al-Karahisariya (without the hamza and long vowel markings) is also registerable.

Steinn Skald. Reblazon of device. Sable, a bearded axe bendwise sinister argent charged on the head with an Uraz rune palewise vert.

Blazoned when registered in December 2014 as Sable, bearded axe bendwise sinister argent charged on the head with an Uraz rune palewise vert, an article was missing.

West Returns - February LoAR

Farleigh de Grey. Device. Per chevron azure and argent, two thistles argent and a griffin segreant maintaining a tankard gules within a bordure counterchanged argent and sable.

This device is returned for redraw, for violating SENA A2C2 which states "Elements must be drawn to be identifiable." Many commenters saw the griffin as headless and confused the tankard for a book.

On redesign, please advise the submitter to draw the thistle with less internal detailing and/or larger so they are easier to identify on the blue background.

Submission heralds are reminded that color and black and white outline forms should match.

Genevieve Elizabeth of Roseberry Topping. Device. Per chevron embattled gules and argent, two roses argent slipped and leaved in chevron vert, and a dragon gules.

This device is returned for violating SENA A3D2c, Unity of Posture and Orientation, which states "A charge group in which postures for different charges must be blazoned individually will not be allowed without period examples of that combination of postures." The charges here are not in a unified arrangement, as the roses must be blazoned separately from the dragon in order to adequately describe their positioning.

March 2015 LoAR (printed May 8, 2015) (No West LoI)

Cover Letter

From Wreath: Discussing, once again, maintained and sustained

The determination of whether or not a charge is sustained or maintained has been done on the basis of visual weight for many years, a practice which has pleased neither heralds nor submitters. A charge which is large enough to grant difference as a secondary or tertiary is frequently considered to not grant difference if conjoined or held, though no difference is granted for the conjoining itself. One of the arguments in favor of the current standard is that maintained charges are charges which, in period practice, are sometimes omitted from the emblazon. Some of these charges are rather large, which is what drives the current sustained/maintained dividing line.

In addition to being immensely difficult to explain to submitters, the practice of changing whether or not difference is granted based on whether or not two charges are touching as a held charge is in contradiction with our general stance on the absence of difference for conjoining of charges. Additionally, the number of period designs which sometimes omit the maintained charges is amazingly small. We are not aware of anyone in the SCA who treats maintained charges as if they can be omitted from the emblazon.

Therefore, commenters are asked to discuss the proposal below. Commenters are asked to discuss the potential issues that this change could create.

A held or conjoined charge which is clearly not a co-primary charge is sustained if it is identifiable, no matter what the size. Sustained charges grant a cadency difference - currently referred to as a "DC". This standard is intended to include charges which are much smaller than the current definition: a charge large enough to grant difference as a tertiary charge will be considered sustained. Sustained charges must have good contrast with their background. All sustained charges count towards the complexity limits - both type and tincture.

A held or conjoined charge which is not identifiable is a maintained charge and does not grant difference. A charge may be rendered unidentifiable through the usual methods, including reduction in size, poor contrast, etc. A maintained charge still may not share a tincture with the field. Maintained charges do not count towards complexity limits.

This does not change how to determine if held or conjoined charges are co-primary charges. We will continue to return items which blur the distinction between co-primary charges and sustained charges.

Anyone in the SCA who wants a sustained charge which is sometimes there and sometimes not should register both variants of the design independently.

From Laurel: Transfers of Heraldic Titles from Kingdoms

This month, an attempt was made by a kingdom to register a new heraldic title and then transfer it to an individual who had been awarded the right to such a title. In July 2013, the rules were changed for transfer of heraldic titles from groups to individuals. The Cover Letter states:

...while we recognize that there are [heraldic] titles which were registered to kingdoms in the days before individual ownership was allowed, and we will not stop the transfer of already registered titles to the individuals they were registered for, new titles should be registered directly by individuals, not kingdoms. Titles registered before the May 2013 Laurel meetings will be allowed to be transferred to individuals, and all such transfers should be submitted to Laurel by December 31, 2013. Any personal titles currently in process for individuals which are being registered to groups should be withdrawn immediately and resubmitted by the individual, with a fee collected.

In the case that the title is expected to be transferred to an individual who has not yet been granted a title, and the above date passes, the individual may purchase the title from the group. All transfer paperwork should be made out as if it were a normal transfer, with the exception that this submission must be accompanied by the usual Laurel payment amount, and that payment must have been collected from the submitter. Whether or not to charge a full submission price instead of just the (currently $ 3) Laurel fee is a matter for the kingdom to determine.

The Cover Letter was clear in intent, if not language. To resolve any ambiguity, we will not register new heraldic titles to kingdoms if they are intended for transfer to an individual. Any new heraldic titles will not be transferable from a kingdom to an individual. Transfers of older titles can be made as long as the following criteria are met: (1) the title must have been registered before May 2013, (2) it cannot be a well-known staff title used by multiple bearers, (3) it may not be in conflict with an open order or award name, and (4) proper payment must have been made by the individual accepting the title transfer. Concerning the second point, transfers of inactive staff titles that are now closely associated with one individual (even if they were not the first to bear the title) will be considered on a case-by-case basis, provided the other conditions are met.

From Pelican: Protection of Real-World Knightly Orders

The submission Order of Alcantara of the Bridge on the East kingdom letter this month raises the question of how we protect mundane knightly orders. SENA NPN4B2 states:

Order and award names may not include the names of the peerage orders or overt references to famous knightly orders such as the Garter. Other types of non-personal names may only use such elements in contexts where no reference to the order is likely to be perceived by members of the order and the general populace.

This was nearly identical to the language in the prior Rules for Submissions.

The present submission has been pended to discuss two issues:

(1) What constitutes "an important knightly order." In this case, the Order of Alcántara is the name of one of the three most important military orders in Spain. It was formed in the 12th century and functioned as a royal agency from the late 15th century to the early 19th century (Nicholas Morton, The Medieval Military Orders 1120-1314 and E. Michael Gerli, Samuel G. Armistead, editors, Medieval Iberia, https://books.google.com/books?id=ra9BtjLRNMsC). Juliana de Luna's "Medieval Secular Order Names" (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/OrderNames/) identifies 70 courtly orders; she has identified 45 more orders that began as religious orders (including this order, the Order of Santiago, the Templars, and the Hospitallers). Not all of these orders are important enough to protect as "important knightly orders," as some survived only for a few years. Some additional fraternal orders (the Esel and Golden Apple for example) may be more important than many courtly orders. We need a standard for how to define which orders are important enough that we should disallow "overt references" to them. We ask for help defining such a standard.

(2) Whether certain kinds of constructions make a more overt reference than others and hence ought to be judged differently for possible presumption. For example, does Order of the Green Garter make a reference that is as clear as Order of the Garter of the East? What about Order of the Fleece (removing the tincture from the Golden Fleece?) Is the Order of the Ermine and Star (both French knightly orders) more problematic than the Order of the Ermine and Bull (where bull is not attested as the name of a period knightly order) or Order of the Ermine and Thistle (with a French and a Scottish order)?

West Acceptances - March LoAR

Shasta, Province of. Reblazon of device. Per chevron azure and argent, a sun Or, an escarbuncle argent and in saltire two pilgrims' staves within a laurel wreath vert.

Registered in January 1973 as Argent, chappe azure, in saltire two pilgrims' staves within a laurel wreath vert, between in fess a sun in his splendour and an escarbuncle argent, we no longer allow charging of the upper portions of a chapé field, and this device could be better described as per chevron. Additionally, the sun shows no face and we are explicitly blazoning its tincture.

West Returns - March LoAR

None.

In Service,
Krysta of Starfall,
Green Crown Pursuivant


SUBMISSONS – May (2015)

ITEMS SENT TO LAUREL

Alfonso Diego Castillo de Guzman (NEW name, NEW device, NEW badge)

  Will not accept major changes; Important - Sound: (no meaning defined); Gender: male; no authenticity request. 16th century Spain written on form.

Alfonso – “Late-Period Spanish Men's Names from Seville,” by Sara L. Uckelman http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/spanish/silversmiths.html shows Alfonso dated to 1376.

Diego – “Late-Period Spanish Men's Names from Seville,” by Sara L. Uckelman http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/spanish/silversmiths.html shows Diego dated to 1540 and 1567.

Castillo de Guzman - Appears to be an actual place that existed in period and still exists today. "Originally built in 960 on the orders of Cordoban caliph Abd ar-Rahman III, this fortress is named after the Reconquista hero Guzmán El Bueno. In 1294, when threatened with the death of his captured son unless he surrendered the castle to attacking Islamic forces, El Bueno threw down his own dagger for the deed to be done." http://www.lonelyplanet.com/spain/andalucia/tarifa/sights/castles-palaces-mansions/castillo-de-guzman. We would appreciate the College of Arms help in documenting that this place was actually called "Castillo de Guzman" in period.

The late period Spanish/Castilian name formation [double given + locative] is shown in Appendix A in SENA.

Armory:
Device: Quarterly argent and erminois, on a cross gules a trident argent, in canton an English panther guardant vert enflamed gules.

     Device appears to be clear of conflict.

Badge: (Fieldless) an English panther guardant vert enflamed gules.

     Badge appears to be clear of conflict.


Andrew of Riga (Request for corrected Blazon; Name and Device registered January 1974)  

Sable, a wyvern erect azure fimbriated argent.
The current blazon reads: Sable, a wivern volant azure fimbriated argent (emblazon attached, submitted November 1973). This blazon was registered to Andrew in January 1974, and a letter notifying him of same was sent to him in March 1974 (letter attached). In December 1974, Andrew sent a redrawn line drawing of his preferred emblazon, and a letter requesting that the device registered to him be changed (letter and line drawing attached) to then-Vesper, Karina of the Far West. The line drawing emblazon shows a wyvern ERECT, not volant, even though the blazon written on the picture states “volant.” Vesper, or Vesper staff, made a note on the original drawing “rotate 30 degrees [sic] clockwise.” We believe that, at the time, Karina or her staff thought a note on the original form would be adequate to make clear the requested change, and may not have thought that there was a need to change the blazoned position in the O and A. Making the requested change to the blazon will not bring this registered device into conflict with anything listed in the O and A as of May 2015.


Angela Marina Castillo de Guzman (NEW name)
Will not accept major changes; Important - Sound: (no meaning defined); Gender: female; no authenticity request. 16th century Spanish written on form.

Angelahttp://www.cs.cmu.edu/~kvs/fnames.html “16th-century Spanish Women’s Names” by Elsbeth Anne Roth shows ; submitter claims the submitted given name is a diminutive; submitter gives permission to change the name to Angela if Angeleta cannot be documented. Latimer cannot find “Angeleta” anywhere, either at the Laurel or Academy of St Gabriel websites or in Tobin or Diez Melcon. Since we were unable to document Angeleta, we have changed the submitted name to Angela. We would appreciate any help in returning the name to the submitted form.

Marinahttp://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/isabella/WomensGivenAlpha.html “Spanish Names from the Late 15th Century” by Juliana de Luna, shows Marina in this spelling.

Castillo de Guzman - Appears to be an actual place that existed in period and still exists today. "Originally built in 960 on the orders of Cordoban caliph Abd ar-Rahman III, this fortress is named after the Reconquista hero Guzmán El Bueno. In 1294, when threatened with the death of his captured son unless he surrendered the castle to attacking Islamic forces, El Bueno threw down his own dagger for the deed to be done." http://www.lonelyplanet.com/spain/andalucia/tarifa/sights/castles-palaces-mansions/castillo-de-guzman We would appreciate the College of Arms help in documenting that this place was actually called "Castillo de Guzman" in period.

The late period Spanish/Castilian name formation [double given + locative] is shown in Appendix A in SENA.


Basia Pomorska (NEW name, NEW device)

Will not accept Major or Minor changes; Important – Meaning, Sound, Spelling, Language and/or culture: Polish; Gender: female; no authenticity request.

Basia – SENA PN1.B.2.e legal name allowance, state issued identification provided in Laurel’s packet. “Basia” is submitter’s legal given name.

Pomorska – found in Hoffman, Polish Surnames, on p. 231: “Pomier-” and “Pomor-”; masculine surname listed “Pomorski.” Per Hoffman, p. 20: “A name ending in [-ski] changes to [-ska] in the feminine. Likely this is an unmarked locative byname, derived from Pomerania. Hoffman’s names are undated. We would appreciate assistance from the CoA in finding a dated source for this Polish surname, or a determination on how we should treat undated names from Hoffman, or both.

The Polish name formation [given + locative byname] is shown in Appendix A in SENA. Per SENA PN2.C.2.d., “Basia” is considered neutral in language and time.

Armory:
Vert, a elephant argent, on a chief embattled Or three crosses potent sable.

     Device appears to be clear of conflict.


Heidi von der Bergen (NEW name, NEW device)

Will not accept Major or Minor change; Gender: female; no authenticity request.

Submitter supplied the following documentation:

Heidi – Legal name allowance per SENA PN1.B.2.e. Vesper and Green Crown attest that “Heidi” is the spelling found on the submitter’s photo identification.

von der – German locative article

Bergen – Shown on FamilySearch, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NL1L-NY7; Batch C96388-1; Antonius von der Bergen, father of a child being christened in 1649. Latimer notes: Brechenmacher vol 1 has Henne von dem Berge in 1481, Hans ab dem Berg 1424, Hans zum Berg 1447, and Hans Rauplotz uff dem Berg 1451. Nothing in the exact form of this submission.

The German name formation [given + locative article + locative] is shown in Appendix A in SENA. Per SENA PN2.C.2.d., “Heidi” is considered neutral in language and time.

Armory:
Per bend indented sable and gules gouty d’eau, a goat passant along the line of division argent.

The red here is the Crayola Classic marker red, from a new pack; heralds present for the meeting said it appeared pink-ish. There are several period examples of beasts “passant along the line of division”, ie. Die Karg <http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/heraldry/siebmacher/81-diekarg.jpg> and Die Rubli <http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/heraldry/siebmacher/203-dierubli.jpg>. Device appears to be clear of conflict.


Hraði Köttr (NEW name, NEW device)

Important - Language and/or culture: none specified; Gender: male; no authenticity request.

Hraði – found in Bassi, p. 11.

Köttr – found in Bassi, p. 25 [kottr]; byname meaning “cat.”

The Norse name formation [given + descriptive byname] is shown in Appendix A in SENA.

Armory:
Gules, a fess sable fimbriated between in chief a cat passant and in base three pheons argent.

The reflection from the Gules on the submitter’s form had “orange’d” the background, which may or may not come across on the LoI uploaded picture. Device appears to be clear of conflict.


Juan Carlos Castillo de Guzman (NEW name, NEW device)

Will not accept major changes; Important – Language and/or Culture: 16th century Spanish; Gender: male; no authenticity request.

Juan – found in “Late-Period Spanish Men's Names from Seville,” by Sara L. Uckelman http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/spanish/silversmiths.html dated to 1376, 1540 and 1567.

Carlos – found in “16th Century Spanish Names: Masculine Given Names Alphabetically,” by Elsbeth Anne Roth (Kathy Van Stone) http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~kvs/heraldry/spanish16/male-given-alpha.html dated to 1571 and 1574.

Castillo de Guzman - Appears to be an actual place that existed in period and still exists today. "Originally built in 960 on the orders of Cordoban caliph Abd ar-Rahman III, this fortress is named after the Reconquista hero Guzmán El Bueno. In 1294, when threatened with the death of his captured son unless he surrendered the castle to attacking Islamic forces, El Bueno threw down his own dagger for the deed to be done." http://www.lonelyplanet.com/spain/andalucia/tarifa/sights/castles-palaces-mansions/castillo-de-guzman We would appreciate the College of Arms help in documenting that this place was actually called "Castillo de Guzman" in period.

We note the SCA registered name: Juan Carlos Castillo de Coronado (Dec. 2005); “Coronado” and “Guzman” are completely different sounds (and Castillo de Coronado and Castillo de Guzman are different places).

The late period Spanish/Castilian name formation [double given + locative] is shown in Appendix A in SENA.

Armory:
Azure, two bars wavy between in chief a caravel sailing to sinister and in base a swordfish reversed argent.

Device appears to be clear of conflict. There was some discussion about the length of the “sword” nose on the fish as compared to the length of the body. We will advise the submitter that perhaps the nose should be longer. The submitter will also be advised to make his bars of the same thickness.


Juliana of Sunsetshire (NEW name)

Will not accept Major change; Gender: female; no authenticity request

Juliana –found in “Feminine Given Names from Kent, 1302-1363,” by AElfwyn aet Gyrwum (Jodi McMaster) http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/aelfwyn/kentfemnames.html with dates from 1344 through 1358. Also [Juliana] has dates of 1196-1220, and 1273 in Withycombe, p. 184. Withycombe also states that this name with its variants was one of the commonest female names in England from the 12th to the 15th century.

of – lingua anglica locative article

Sunsetshire – SCA official branch, name registered April 1982

The English name formation [given + locative article + locative] is shown in Appendix A in SENA. “of” is the required locative article under SENA PN1.B.2.f.


Mór ingen Donnchaid (Resub device to Kingdom; Name submitted 3/2015)

Argent, a fess wavy azure between a raven close and a wolf passant regardant sable.
No conflicts were found for this design.

Prior return (at Kingdom): Argent, a fess wavy azure between a raven ?rising regardant wings displayed? and a wolf passant regardant sable.

     Mayken de Houtman, registered in December of 2004 (via Caid): Argent, a fess nebuly azure and in chief a raven displayed sable. There is no heraldic difference between nebuly and wavy, and if this raven is even partially “displayed”, the addition of the wolf only generates one difference.

     Additionally, this raven is not in a cleanly blazonable posture; it’s body is “rising”, the wings are “displayed” and the head is “regardant.” If the raven was truly “rising regardant”, with the wings together over the back of the body instead of displayed, it would clear the above conflict, per SENA Appendix L.

     The emblazon submitted here makes the position of the raven obvious, and clears the previous conflict found when this was returned at Kingdom for a redraw in March 2015.


Rauðhrefna Skeggadóttir (NEW badge, name registered Oct. 2012)

Or a moose rampant to sinister and a dexter tierce purpure.
This appears to be clear of conflict. The tierce used with another charge is a SFPP.


Rebecca the Adamant (NEW name, NEW device)

Will not accept major changes; Important - Sound: no sound specified; Gender: female; no request for authenticity

Rebecca – listed at [http://heraldry.sca.org/names/jewish.html], Jewish Naming Convention in Angevin England by Eleazar ha-Levi; also in “Late Sixteenth Century English Given Names: Women's Names listed by frequency,” by Talan Gwynek (Brian M. Scott). Submitter’s legal name, as well, if that will help with a documentable form of the descriptive byname formation. (documents will be supplied if they are needed)

the – descriptive byname article

Adamant – is dated to 885 in English in various spellings in the OED, as a noun meaning a very hard type of stone, eventually meaning the equivalent of diamond or lodestone. The usage as an adjective appears to be very late period. The first example of an adjectival use that applies to humans seems to be 1535 "with a penne of yron and with Adamant claws". Adamant in the sense of being hard-hearted is dated to 1677: "which might make impressions on an iron breast or an adamant heart." Usage as the poetical or rhetorical name for the embodiment of surpassing hardness is considered modern.

In R&W, p. 216 at HARD we find Roger Hard dated 1275 from the OE Heard, or a nickname “harsh, severe.” We ask the College of Arms to help us better document the formation of this name.

Armory:
Per pale azure and argent, six apple blossoms, two, two and two counterchanged argent and sable.

Device appears to be clear of conflict.


Regina Rozanova (NEW name, NEW device)

Will not accept major changes; Important – Language and/or Culture: no language/culture specified; Gender: female; no request for authenticity.

Regina – From“Polish Feminine Given Names, 1600-1650, “by Aryanhwy merch Catmael http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/polish/polishfem.html, dated to 1620.

Rozanova – From “Botanical Bynames in Medieval Russia,” by Paul Wickenden of Thanet http://www.goldschp.net/archive/plantnames.html#flowers dated to 1628. We changed the name from the submitted “Rozanov” to correct for the feminine. Since this is a botanical byname, this change may be incorrect. We would appreciate the College of Arms guidance on this.

The Russian name formation [given + byname] is shown in Appendix A in SENA. Russian and Polish are compatible per SENA Appendix C.

Armory: Per chevron inverted argent and azure, a bird rising sable maintaining in it’s beak a threaded sewing needle Or, and three roses two and one argent.

Device appears to be clear of conflict.


Rónán of Winter’s Gate (NEW name, NEW device)

Name submitted on form was Rónán of Wintersgate; it must be changed to match the registered Branch name per SENA PN1B2f. Since will not accept major or minor changes is marked, we could not make this change. Submitter supplied a revised Name Form, with the corrected form of “Winter’s Gate” and “No MAJOR changes” marked. We will forward it to Laurel as submitted on the second form.

Will not accept major changes; no preferences marked; no authenticity requested.

Rónán – listed in [http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/tangwystyl/irish100/] 100 Most Popular Men's Names in Early Medieval Ireland compiled by Heather Rose Jones (ska Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn). Names are all from the pre-Norman period, roughly pre-12th century.

of Winter’s Gate – Shown on the O&A as: Winter's Gate, Shire of - This branch name, registered in July of 1979 (via the West), was updated to Winter's Gate, Barony of in December of 1984 (via the West).

The name formation [given + lingua Anglica locative article + SCA registered branch locative byname] is required by SENA PN1B2f.

Armory:
Counter-ermine, a seal naiant, its tail reflexed above its head argent, on a chief Or three fleur de lys sable.

For the form of blazon of the seal, see the badge registered to Sophie Xylander: Gules, a seal naiant to sinister, its tail reflexed above its head, proper, within a bordure sable fimbriated Or. [Calorminus ursinus]. The device appears to be clear of conflict; the position of the seal is a SFPP.


Ryka von Kreussen (NEW name, NEW device)

Will not accept major OR minor changes; Important – not marked; Gender: not marked; no request for authenticity

Ryka – From “Low German Names in Latin, 1424: Feminine Given Names”, Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/rottum1424fem.html).

von Kreussen – From “German Names from Nurnberg, 1497: Surnames N-Z”, Aryanhwy merch Catmael, listed alpha under “von…” (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/surnamesnurnn-z.html).

The German name formation [given + locative article + locative] is shown in Appendix A in SENA.

Armory:
Sable, a griffin segreant argent maintaining a sword Or, and a dexter tierce rayonny argent.

Device appears to be clear of conflict. The tierce used with another charge is a SFPP.

We believe this to be clear of Brandon d'Arindel (SCA) Sable, a male griffin rampant argent,  with one CD for the difference between a standard and a male griffin, and a second for the addition of the tierce. The difference between “griffin” and “male griffin” was established in the November 1997 decision of Aodhnait inghean mhic Chárthaigh (Drachenwald). Device. Sable, a griffin segreant argent; which WAS found to be in conflict with Brandon d'Arindel (SCA) Sable, a male griffin rampant argent, with one CD given for the difference between a standard and a male griffin.


Silvia of Thrace (NEW name, NEW device)

Will not accept major changes; Important - Meaning: (no meaning defined); Gender: female; no authenticity request.

Silvia – From http://heraldry.sca.org/names/byzantine/PLRE_fem_names.html#s “Common Names of the Aristocracy in the Roman Empire During the 6th and 7th Centuries : Feminine Names Alphabetically” by Berret Chavez.

of – standard English locative preposition.

Thrace – In “Titus Andronicus” William Shakespeare uses the term “Thracian” in reference to a person from Thrace. In “The Amorus Epistle of Paris to Helen” we find the word “Thrace” used as a place name. We have included the title page, the page that starts the poem, and the page that has Thrace on it. But... it's probably not by Shakespeare but by another poet at the turn of the 17th C. Vesper found the history of the volume it was published in, "The Passionate Pilgrim", in several scholarly works available via Google but NOT free for download. There is also a summary of the history at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Passionate_Pilgrim. The relevant part is: "Jaggard issued an expanded edition of The Passionate Pilgrim in 1612 (ESTC S106170), containing additional poems on the theme of Helen of Troy, announced on the title page ("Whereunto is newly added two Love Epistles, the first from Paris to Hellen, and Hellen's answere back again to Paris"). These were in fact taken from Thomas Heywood's Troia Britannica, which Jaggard had published in 1609. Heywood protested the piracy in his Apology for Actors (1612), writing that Shakespeare was "much offended" with Jaggard for making "so bold with his name." Jaggard withdrew the attribution to Shakespeare from unsold copies of the 1612 edition." The summary also has images of the original and amended title pages of the editions, uploaded with this submission.

The English/Lingua Anglica name formation [given +locative article + location] is shown in Appendix A in SENA.

Armory:
Vert, a stag’s head erased argent between three increscents Or, one and two.

Device appears to be clear of conflict.


Walter Kazakov (NEW name, NEW device)

Important – Language and/or Culture: 16thC Polish (this preference waived via email from the submitter); Gender: male; no request for authenticity.

Walter – Legal name allowance claimed (SENA PN1.B.2.e); photo ID supplied in Laurel’s packet. Also, [Walter] is listed in [<http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ walraven/polish/>] “Polish Given Names in Nazwiska Polaków” by Walraven van Nijmegen (Brian R. Speer) and Arval Benicoeur (Josh Mittleman) under “German, Frankish or French.” 

Kazakov – [Kazakov] is listed in [http://heraldry.sca.org/names/paul/ka.html] “Paul Goldschmidt's Dictionary of Period Russian Names” under KAZAK.

The Russian name formation [given + patronym] is per Appendix A in SENA, shown in in [http://heraldry.sca.org/names/paul/ka.html] “Paul Goldschmidt's Dictionary of Period Russian Names”. Per SENA PN2.C.2.d., “Walter” is considered neutral in language and time.

Armory:
Or, a brown bear statant proper, on a chief gules three barrels fesswise argent.

Device appears to be clear of conflict.


Willeam Grenetrewis (NEW device, name registered March 2004)

Sable, on a pale vert fimbriated argent a sword inverted proper, a chief wavy ermine.

We will instruct the submitter to add a wave or two to the chief line of division. Device appears to be clear of conflict.


Xaviar Miguel Castillo de Guzman (NEW name, NEW device)

Will not accept major changes; Important – Language and/or Culture: (no meaning defined); Gender: male; no authenticity request. 16th century Spain written on form.

Xaviar – In this spelling, submitted under the modern name allowance, SENA PN1.B.2.e (copy of passport included in Laurel’s packet).

Miguel –Found in“16th Century Spanish Names: Masculine Given Names Alphabetically,” by Elsbeth Anne Roth http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~kvs/heraldry/spanish16/male-given-alpha.html dated to the 16th Century.

Castillo de Guzman - Appears to be an actual place that existed in period and still exists today. "Originally built in 960 on the orders of Cordoban caliph Abd ar-Rahman III, this fortress is named after the Reconquista hero Guzmán El Bueno. In 1294, when threatened with the death of his captured son unless he surrendered the castle to attacking Islamic forces, El Bueno threw down his own dagger for the deed to be done." http://www.lonelyplanet.com/spain/andalucia/tarifa/sights/castles-palaces-mansions/castillo-de-guzman We would appreciate the College of Arms help in documenting that this place was actually called "Castillo de Guzman" in period.

The late period Spanish/Castilian name formation [double given + locative] is shown in Appendix A in SENA.

Armory:
Quarterly argent and Or, on a cross vert a standing seraph Or, in canton a peacock azure.

Device appears to be clear of conflict.


ITEMS RETURNED FOR FURTHER WORK

Angela Marina Castillo de Guzman (NEW device RETURNED for conflict; NEW name sent on to Laurel)

Argent, a chevron gules between two English panthers combatant guardant vert enflamed gules and a pomegranate tree blasted vert fructed gules.
We find the following conflict: Alyna of the Ilex (Sept. 2002): Argent, a chevron throughout gules between three sprigs of holly vert fructed gules. Also Leonardo Phenix (Feb. 2011): Argent, a chevron gules between three gryphons' heads erased vert.

The easiest change to clear these conflicts would be to change the color of the tree to anything other than vert or gules, though the fruit could remain gules.


Bárekr Úlfsson (Resubmission to Kingdom: device RETURNED– low contrast with the field)

Vert, a saltire argent, overall a wolf salient sable.
This device was returned with advice to either reverse the field and saltire colors, or to make the saltire “fatter” and put the wolf entirely on it. Submitter did neither of these things. Per SENA A.3.B.4.a, the “overall” charge must have good contrast with the field, not the ordinary (in this case, the saltire), so this must be returned. As submitter blazoned, “on” the saltire, this appears to be clear of conflict. Prior to the meeting, both the submitter and the consulting herald were notified of the problem. No redraw was received in time to consider it at this meeting.


Juliana of Sunsetshire (NEW device RETURNED; NEW name sent on to Laurel)

Per fess gules and vert, a demi-sun issuant from the line of division Or, in base a sea-coney <position unblazonable> argent.
Device appears to be clear of conflict, in either the “naiant” or “erect” position. Returned for clarification of sea-coney position (S/B “erect” for body up, tail to base and curled in a loop) and % of coney-body to fish-tail.


Marc de Arundel (Device APPEAL to Laurel RETURNED; Name registered 9/07)

Sable, a tree blasted and eradicated between six mullets of four points three and three argent.
This device was found to be in conflict with the flag of the Stewards of Gondor, Sable, a tree blasted and eradicated beneath an arch of seven mullets of eight points argent, which was registered as protected on the LoAR of June 2013, the same LoAR on which this submission was returned by Laurel. The appeal requested, at the suggestion of Vesper staff, that we review the timing and procedure for Laurel’s protection of Armory of Major Characters or Significant Geographical Locations from Literary Sources. Our understanding was that for any item listed by Laurel in the O and A, the Commenting process would need to be followed, leading us to believe that a listing of protected armory (the flag of the Stewards of Gondor) included on the very same LoAR as Marc’s return, apparently without due process, was a violation of the administrative rules of the College of Arms.

Unfortunately, Administrative Handbook, of the College of Arms of the Society for Creative Anachronism, Inc. January 24, 2009, modified August 17, 2013, Submission Regulations, section III.B. 6. we found: “Armory of Major Characters or Significant Geographical Locations from Literary Sources - The armory of major characters or significant geographical locations from period or modern literary works of all genres and media (including visual, aural, and written works) may be protected on a case by case basis. Armory considered sufficiently important will be listed in the Society Armorial and Ordinary when it is brought to Laurel's attention, but is protected prior to that addition.” [emphasis ours]

Therefore, we are unable to forward this appeal to Laurel, since the basis for appeal is not valid under the current administrative rules.


Sidach mac Áed (NEW name Returned)

Will not accept major changes; no most important characteristic; Gender: male; no request for authenticity.

Submitter supplied the following documentation:

Sidach – Submitter sent a two page essay showing his documentation for this name, which hinges primarily on Black p. 728-729, which shows “Sithech, Sithach” dated as early as the Book of Deer (mac Sithig) and forward through 1178, to 1230 where it appears as “Seth,” and then in 1224 Sythach. None of the examples in Black support this spelling. None of the cited names use a "d", and only the mention of "sidheach" as the origin of the name has the "dh". Documentation shows a word “sidach”, but not all words are used as names and we can find no example of a name with this spelling.

mac – patronymic article.

Áed – is listed in A Simple Guide to Constructing 12th Century Scottish Gaelic Names by Sharon L. Krossa at [http://heraldry.sca.org/names/simplescotgaelicnames12.htm], without the accent mark (Aed). The genitive form is [Éda]. Therefore, the correct form of the patronymic byname would be [mac Éda].

The Scottish name formation [given + patronymic article + genitive of father’s given] is shown in Appendix A in SENA.

The name would have to be changed twice: Sidach needs to be “Sithech”, “Sithach”, “Seth”, or “Sythach”. The patronymic must be in the genitive “Éda”. We felt that changing the given name that much AND changing the patronym to the genitive would be considered a Major change, which the submitter does not permit.


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