Minutes of the June, 2013 Heralds Meeting

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MINUTES OF THE MONTHLY MEETING – 15 June XLVIII (2013)

Start: 12:15 pm; End: 2:30 pm

The meeting was held at the home of Eilis O'Boirne in Berkeley, CA. In general, all future meetings will be held at Eilis’ house (2322 Russell Street, Berkeley CA 94705; 510-486-0633 -- call for directions). “Road show” meetings, if any, will be announced well in advance.

ATTENDEES
Moira O’Connor, Vesper; Gwenhwyfaer ferch Gwilym, Matins; Astrith of Swansvale, Latimer, Eilis o’Boirne, Baldric; Krysta of Starfall, Green Crown; Aasa Thorvaldsdottir, Greencloak/Black Mark, Frederick of Holland, PaL; Mikael Auraprester, Lurker.

COLLEGE OF HERALDS MEETINGS
Heralds’ Meetings for the remainder of 2013: Jul 14, Aug 18, Sep 22, Oct 20, Nov 24, no meeting in December, Jan 5, 2014 (road show at 12th Night).

Walk-in submissions will be held over until the following month unless they arrive early enough to be processed in before the scheduled start of the meeting.

We are conducting some preliminary name research through the West Kingdom heraldic consultation mailing list wkheralds_consults@yahoogroups.com . This list is open to all those interested in West Kingdom book heraldry: both names and devices, and either to contribute or to ask questions. To join the list, please subscribe through Yahoo or at wkheralds_consults-subscribe@yahoogroups.com. If you subscribe by e-mail, you can complete the process by replying to the confirmation e-mail; it is not necessary to log in to Yahoo. Please note that initial posts are moderated and thus may not appear on the list immediately.

PERSONNEL -- RECENT CHANGES AND POSITIONS AVAILABLE:


REPORTS

Vesper: I am still looking for a successor. Heading out to KWHSS in 2 weeks.

Seawolf: May Investiture was good.

Sable Swan: May Coronet was a success. We had good coverage for the tournament. Not enough people entered Lord Defender so it was put off until Golden Rivers Championship the next weekend. Good heraldic coverage for that tourney as well. Starting the process of looking for a deputy/successor.

Stellanordica: No report

Exchequer: We have money.

Banner: No report

Baldric: Krysta taught a class at A&S. It was decently attended.

Brachet: Vacant

Greencloak: June crown is next weekend. Come out and Herald.

Latimer: There was consultation at May Coronet with fairly good attendance even though I was not there. Next consultation table will be at June Crown.


ANNOUNCEMENTS

SUBMISSIONS GUIDELINES
UPCOMING EVENTS
The next Known World Heralds and Scribes Symposium will be held in the Barony of Bjornsborg in the Kingdom of Ansteorra (San Antonio, Texas) on June 28-30, 2013.

GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

VOICE HERALDRY: Greencloak will continue to hold voice heraldry training sessions at the beginning of events to encourage involvement at the event.

MAILING LIST: The West Kingdom College of Heralds has a mailing list for internal communication. Any herald is welcome to join by request. To join the list, please subscribe at wkheralds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com.

ELECTRONIC RESOURCES: Many interesting heraldic links can be found through the SCA Heraldry web page at http://www.sca.org/heraldry, including the Laurel home page, the on-line Armorial and Ordinary (with search capabilities) and The Academy of St. Gabriel (an onomastic and heraldic consultation service). The West Kingdom Heraldry site and the West Kingdom Awards List can be accessed through the West Kingdom site, http://www.westkingdom.org. Heraldic queries may also be addressed to Moira at herald@westkingdom.org -- answers may take a few days.

West Kingdom College of Heralds Minutes are published on the web. They may be read at or printed from the heralds' website at http://heralds.westkingdom.org/Minutes.htm. There is a colored version and a printer-friendly black and white version available.

BRACHET MEETINGS
The office of Brachet is currently vacant, no Brachet meetings are being held.

EAST BAY COMMENTING MEETINGS
These meetings comment on heraldic submissions from other Kingdoms. Please consider attending – you do not have to be able to attend every week. They are a fast way to learn how the Rules of Submission work and how to research armory. These meetings have changed location and are now in Walnut Creek on Wednesday nights. If you are interested, contact the Latimer Herald, Astrið of Swansvale (Gretchen Lebednik) at .


EXCERPTS FROM THE LOAR

The cover letters, acceptances and returns for the past can be found at http://www.sca.org/heraldry/loar/. If you are interested in responding to some of the calls for commentary put out by the Laurel Sovereign of Arms, please be sure to visit the site.

March 2013 LoAR (printed 2 May 2013) (31 Dec 2012 West LoI)

Cover letter

From Laurel: April Showers Bring a New May Exchequer

With the end of April and the beginning of May, the Chancellor of the Exchequer for the College of Arms is changing hands. Thanks goes to Rory for three and a half years of service as the College's Exchequer. He now gets to concentrate on being a Principal Herald for his Kingdom. Please welcome back Omar Mohammud Mirzazadeh who, having experienced the delights of being a Principal Herald, will now take on the role of Exchequer for the College.

As of May 1, 2013, please send all checks or money orders for submissions to Omar. His address is now listed under "Send What to Whom".

From Palimpsest: Clarifying Section IV.C.4 of the Admin Handbook: Proof of Entitlement for Reserved Elements and Submission Types

The Administrative Handbook, section IV.C.4. "Proof of Entitlement" currently reads, in part:

4. Proof of Entitlement - If a submission involves an item reserved by Society convention to those of certain rank or occupation (e.g., a coronet) or an augmentation, evidence of the submitter's right to use the reserved charge or augmentation must be provided. Where a registered item involving a reserved charge or augmentation is transferred, evidence must be provided of the recipient's entitlement to use of the charge or augmentation. Normally a statement by the kingdom submissions herald giving the date of earning that rank or augmentation is sufficient.

However, armory and augmentations are no longer the only registerable elements or types of submissions that may need proof of entitlement when registered; under SENA, some name elements may need such proof and under the current Administrative Handbook, heraldic titles for individuals also need such proof. To clarify this, we are changing IV.C.4, effective immediately, to read:

4. Proof of Entitlement - Submissions which involve elements or types of submissions which Society convention reserves to those with certain rank or bestowed privilege must include proof that the submitter is entitled to register that reserved element or type of submission. Reserved elements include coronets, name elements such as "Chevalier", elements listed in Table 1 of the Glossary of Terms, etc. Submissions of augmentations are reserved to entities that have been bestowed an augmentation of arms. Submissions of heraldic titles for individuals are reserved to individuals who have been granted the right to a heraldic title according to their kingdom's customs or by Laurel. This applies equally to transfers and to new submissions. Normally, a statement by the kingdom submissions herald giving the date of earning that entitlement is sufficient.

From Pelican: Da'ud Notation

In this Letter of Acceptances and Returns, we are using two new characters in Da'ud notation, both extensions of existing patterns: {au} is an a marked with a breve (a short mark), which matches the Unicode character U+0103 "LATIN SMALL LETTER A WITH BREVE" and {uo} is u with a ring over it, which matches the unicode character U+016F "LATIN SMALL LETTER U WITH RING ABOVE".

From Pelican: Some Name Resources (An Ongoing Series)

English household names are often derived from personal names. As with other household patterns in English, the pattern is X('s) House or House of X, not House X. Household names derived from people's names in English take a couple of forms. The most common household name uses the individual's full name, like þe hous of Julyane huxster or sir Henry Percy house (both period examples from Sharon Krossa's "A Brief, Incomplete, and Rather Stopgap Article about European Household and Other Group Names Before 1600" (http://medievalscotland.org/names/eurohouseholds/). The same pattern is found using household as the designator.

Examples that use only given names, only surnames, or only titles are used in limited contexts. Examples of X's House with given names are found only for saint's names and legendary names, like King Arthur. For surnames, X's House or X House are mostly found in references to actual buildings rather than to people, though they may sometimes be used to refer to the people living in such a building. House of X seems to have been used largely to refer to noble dynasties (like the House of Lancaster and House of York. All of these patterns are registerable.

From Wreath: The Shape of Things -- Gouttes

Commenters were recently asked to find period depictions of gouttes, to better determine whether teardrop-shaped gouttes are acceptable or not.

Gouttes are fairly rare in period heraldry. The vast majority were drawn with quite distinct wavy tails. There were two counter examples found:

The gouttes in Afonzo V's emblem cannot be described as discrete charges, while the ones in the Virgil Raber Wappenbuch can be. We are less concerned with the depiction of essentially maintained charges treated as artistic detailing, such as with the drops of water flung from Afonzo V's paddle wheel, or with drops of blood coming from a couped head. For non-maintained or otherwise artistic charges, however, given the evidence we express a strong preference for the traditional wavy-tailed gouttes. Teardrop shaped gouttes are registerable as long as they are elongated, more than twice as long as they are wide. Any other shape will be returned after the October 2013 decision meetings.

From Wreath: Pelican Hats

We asked commenters about further defining the restricted regalia of the Order of the Pelicans. When it was originally listed on the October 1998 Cover Letter as (Fieldless) A chapeau, it went into the Ordinary and Armorial database as (Tinctureless) A chapeau. The question arose as to the precise definition of a chapeau -- a cap of maintenance, specifically red or not, or a hat of any kind?

It seems quite unfair to the rest of the populace to declare that hats of any kind in any color are restricted to the Order of the Pelican, and we are positive this was not the original intent. While there are some minor variations across the Society, it seems clear from discussion that Parker's definition of a chapeau as "a cap of maintenance...generally of red velvet turned up with ermine" is typically what is meant here. Several kingdoms use argent goutty de sang as a variation on ermine, and while that is an obvious SCA conceit, we are willing to allow it.

In order to avoid confusion in the future, we are therefore clarifying that the restricted regalia of the Order of the Pelican is:

This change also will be updated in the Reserved Charges section of the Glossary of Terms. While there is not usually a DC between types of hats, only an actual cap of maintenance is considered a reserved charge.

From Wreath: Celtic Crosses

Lately we have received several submissions with charges blazoned as a Celtic cross which are clearly not. Instead, these charges are typically a cross couped combined with an annulet in some fashion. Precedent says:
The so-called "Celtic" cross is not. A Celtic cross is a specific type of cross, which has tapering arms. Adding an annulet to any particular type of cross does not automatically make it a Celtic cross. This "crosshair" depiction of a cross is not acceptable. [Sadb ingen Chonchobair, R-Atlantia, Jan 2010 LoAR]

Any Google image search on "Celtic cross" will turn up a number of correct crosses (at least for outline, ignoring the knotwork). Celtic crosses default to Latin, have the annulet clearly conjoined with the limbs of the cross, and have arms that taper towards the center. Whether or not the ends of the arms are potent is considered artistic license. Celtic crosses are not period heraldic charges, but are period artifacts.

There is at least one known period depiction of a plain cross with an annulet, specifically a plain cross throughout with an annulet fretted or interlaced in the Italian arms of Moresini in BSB Cod.icon. 273 on f.48r (http://daten.digitale-sammlungen.de/bsb00001420/image_99).

West Kingdom acceptances

Brigid O'Connor. Device. Argent, a wolf sejant ululant sable and in chief three quatrefoils purpure.

Please advise the submitter to draw internal detailing on the wolf.

There is a step from period practice for the use of the non-period ululant posture.

Catriona Morgan. Device. Argent, a heart and a bordure purpure.

Nice device!

Deporodh of Rannoch. Reblazon of device. Per chevron azure and argent, two mullets argent and a birch leaf vert.

Blazoned when registered in August 1977 as Per chevron abased azure and argent, two mullets argent and in base a birch leaf [Betula alba] erect proper, we are clarifying the primary charge group and tincture of the leaf.

Kalista Kulinova. Name and device. Gules, in cross two compass stars elongated to base and two bears statant respectant argent.

There is a step from period practice for the use of compass stars.

Myfanwy ferch Dafydd ap Madoc. Name and device. Argent, an ivy vine palewise vert and a gore sable.

Kingdom asked for help documenting the spelling Myfanwy. Precedent says: "While the spelling Myfanwy is not clearly dated to before 1600, it is consistent with late period Welsh spellings and can thus be registered." [Myfanwy verch Ieuan, 2/2011 LoAR, A-West] The same is true of Dafydd.

West Kingdom returns

(none).

April 2013 LoAR (printed 5 June 2013) (no West LoI)

Cover letter

From Laurel: Job Opening - Pelican Sovereign of Arms

After three years of service as Pelican Queen of Arms, Juliana de Luna wants to retire from that job in January 2014. Therefore, we're looking for a successor to take up the reins (reigns?) and become the Pelican Sovereign of Arms.

If you are interested, please see the below job description and send a letter of interest and your resumé to bids@heraldry.sca.org by Saturday, August 31, 2013. If you have questions about the job, please contact Juliana at pelican@heraldry.sca.org or myself at laurel@heraldry.sca.org>

Pelican Sovereign of Arms

The Pelican Sovereign of Arms is an educational deputy of the Laurel Principal Sovereign of Arms, responsible for the consideration of and decisions concerning names submitted for registration by the College of Arms.

Pelican is an unpaid position, currently requiring approximately 20 hours a week. The position requires considerable tact and patience, onomastic knowledge, research and reasoning ability, a clear understanding of the Standards for Evaluation and past Laurel rulings, the ability to write clearly and succinctly, the ability to work within tight deadlines and coordinate closely with Wreath, Laurel and other staff to produce a Laurel Letter of Acceptance and Return monthly, computer literacy and word processing skills, reliable e-mail and telephone access, and time and ability to travel. Access to a good research library is desirable but not required. Given the current structure of the office, a high-speed internet connection is useful but it is not required.

Resumés must be sent in both hard copy to Laurel at the address at the top of this Cover Letter and electronically to bids@heraldry.sca.org. The electronic applications will be posted on OSCAR with addresses and other contact information stripped from them. Resumés must be received by Saturday, August 31, 2013, with an expected start date of January 2014.

From Pelican: Some Name Resources (An Ongoing Series)

For the last few months, we've been discussing models for household names. We've talked about inn-sign names across Europe and other household names in Gaelic and English. This month, we're going to bring together information about household names in Welsh.

The best starting point for household names in Welsh is Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn's "Period Welsh Models for SCA Households and the Nomenclature Thereof" (http://heatherrosejones.com/welshhouseholdname/index.html). You should definitely start there.

In Welsh, groups of people are most frequently named after the personal name of a common ancestor (most frequently the given name but sometimes a combination of elements):

Especially in genealogical texts, it's moderately common to find "Plant personal name" as a term describing the common descendents of personal name. It doesn't have the same legalistic sense as Irish "clann", although you can find something vaguely resembling that sense for "wyrion personal name" (literally "grandsons of personal name"). But these would always be used with a personal name of the common ancestor, not with an abstract totem or symbol. [Zara the Quiet, 05/04, R-Æthelmearc]

Gwely (and later gafael) refers to a group of descendants of an individual who share land. In 2003, Harpy (Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn's heraldic title) gave some examples of this type of group from the mid 14th century (in the Black Book of St. Davids), including gwele Cradoc ap Duryn~, gwele Ieuan ap Kediuor, gwele Gwylbrid', and gwele redwyth' (from [Mat of Forth Castle and Adekin Caradoc, 08/2003 LoAR, A-Caid]). This source uses the moderately unusual spelling gwele instead of the more common gwely.

We have no evidence of names of groups of people in Welsh formed from the names of charges or other inn-sign elements. We likewise have no evidence of fanciful or legendary names. Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn suggests that a few types of household names may use place names or regional ones, such as those using Teulu "warband" or Llys "court." However, the evidence for these is relatively limited. See the article for more details.

From Pelican: An Apology

The June 2012 and December 2012 Cover Letters referenced a "Matronymics Bynames" page in Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" article. That page was a collection of research notes that was not intended for public consumption. We apologize to the author for making this link public. The analysis of the data presented in the Cover Letter, like all Laurel decisions, is the interpretation of the Laurel office, and may not be the same as the analysis of the author of the source material.

From Wreath: Individually Attested Patterns and You

More submissions are making use of the Individually Attested Patterns rules in SENA, which is good. However, we are starting to see more and more insufficient and scattershot documentation, which is not good, as it involves more work by commenters and a greater chance of return for insufficient documentation.

SENA A4A specifically says "All elements in an Individually Attested Pattern must be found in that single time and place, including charges, arrangement of charge groups, and lines of division." SENA A4B states "Each element of the armory which falls outside the core style rules must be documented...The overall design of the submission must be similar to the types of designs that document the use of the non-core style elements. In general, examples must match the submission in style and complexity." The combination of these two statements may be a bit confusing at first.

SENA A4C details the number and types of examples that are required to demonstrate the desired pattern to allow registration. It should be remembered that SENA A4C1 explicitly states that "All examples should come from a single heraldic style or culture; the submissions should match the style of that culture as well."

From Palimpsest: Closing a Loophole in the Marshalling Rules

On the November 2012 LoAR Cover Letter, Wreath noted that the marshalling rules in SENA do not address designs in which one section of the field has multiple charge groups. This was not intended. Not long after, Palimpsest issued a Rules Letter with a proposed change to SENA section A.6.F.2.d to address this.

The Standards for Evaluation of Names and Armory section A.6.F.2.d, Multiple Charges in a Section, currently reads, in part:

d. Multiple Charges in a Section: When any section of such a field contains multiple charges of the same type in a way that cannot be described as a standard single pattern covering the entire field, it creates the appearance of marshalling.

For example, Quarterly, azure and Or, in canton three crosses fleury argent creates the appearance of marshalling, because the charges cannot be blazoned as a single pattern covering the entire field. Similarly, Per pale sable and erminois, each section charged with three billets two and one counterchanged creates the appearance of marshalling, because each section appears to be an independent piece of armory. However, Per pale sable and erminois, six billets two, two, and two counterchanged does not create the appearance of marshalling, because the arrangement of all the charges can be blazoned as a single coherent pattern.

To close this loophole and disallow designs in which any section of the field has multiple charge groups, we are changing A.6.F.2.d., effective immediately, to read:

d. Multiple Charges in a Section: When any section of such a field contains multiple charges of the same type in a way that cannot be described as a standard single pattern covering the entire field, multiple charges of different types, or multiple charge groups, it creates the appearance of marshalling.

For example, Quarterly azure and Or, in canton three crosses fleury argent creates the appearance of marshalling, because the charges cannot be blazoned as a single pattern covering the entire field. Similarly, Per pale sable and erminois, each section charged with three billets two and one counterchanged creates the appearance of marshalling, because each section appears to be an independent piece of armory. However, Per pale sable and erminois, six billets two, two, and two counterchanged does not create the appearance of marshalling, because the arrangement of all the charges can be blazoned as a single coherent pattern. For example, Quarterly sable and Or, in canton a lion and a unicorn combattant Or creates the appearance of marshalling because a single section of the field contains multiple types of charges. Similarly, Per pale gules and argent, a tree and in chief a mullet gules creates the appearance of marshalling because the tree and mullet are forced into the argent section of the field and thus it contains multiple charge groups.

From Palimpsest: Closing Some Loopholes in Personal Name Presumption

This month, we are closing a number of loopholes in the Standards for Evaluation of Names and Armory section PN.4, Personal Name Presumption.

Some portions of PN.4.B.1 specifically say that they apply to attested bynames; this would allow the use of the Legal Name Allowance or other allowances to register such name elements, which is not the intention. The current relevant portions of PN.4.B.1 read:

Attested bynames which are identical to titles used in the Society are generally not allowed for individuals who do not have that rank. Relatively minor changes to the form of the byname can remove the appearance of a claim to rank.

and

Attested given names that are identical to titles and forms of address may be registered in contexts that make it clear that they are given names and not titles.

and

Attested bynames incorporating the names of Society peerage orders and real-world knightly orders are not considered a claim to rank or membership in those orders.

To close this loophole, we are changing these portions of PN.4.B.1., effective immediately, to remove the word "attested". It will then read:>

Bynames which are identical to titles used in the Society are generally not allowed for individuals who do not have that rank. Relatively minor changes to the form of the byname can remove the appearance of a claim to rank.

and

Given names that are identical to titles and forms of address may only be registered in contexts that make it clear that they are given names and not claims to rank or titles.

and

Bynames incorporating the names of Society peerage orders and real-world knightly orders are not considered a claim to rank or membership in those orders.

The rest of PN.4.B.1 remains the same, including restriction of bynames identical to non-Society titles.

The wording of PN.4.B.5 currently refers solely to bynames; however, some given names (including late-period English surnames used as bynames) can also give the appearance of being an occupational name, creating the appearance that this rule is intended to prevent. The current text of PN.4.B.5 reads:

5. Combination of Occupational and Locative Bynames: Names may not combine an occupational byname and a locative byname in a way that seems to be a claim to rank or official position. Most such combinations do not have this appearance. This should not be understood to suggest that the Crown cannot make such appointments; however, as they are not necessarily permanent, such appointments may not be used as justification for registered names.

For example, a name submission cannot use the combinations the Bard of Armagh or Abbot of Saint Giles or Champion of Ealdormere. However, the Seamstress of York is unlikely to be understood to be the only seamstress, or an official seamstress and so would be registerable.

To close this loophole, we are changing PN.4.B.5, effective immediately, to read:

5. Combination of Occupational and Locative Bynames: Names may not combine an occupational byname and a locative byname in a way that seems to be a claim to rank or official position. Some given names appear identical to occupational or locative bynames; names may not combine a given name of this form with an occupational or locative byname in a way that seems to be a claim to rank or official position. Most such combinations do not have this appearance. This should not be understood to suggest that the Crown cannot make such appointments; however, as they are not necessarily permanent, such appointments may not be used as justification for registered names.

For example, a name submission cannot use the combinations Bard of Armagh or Abbot of Saint Giles or Champion of Ealdormere. Similarly, while Kingdom, London, and Herald can all be documented as both given names and bynames, Kingdom Marshall, London Herald and Herald of Wyvernwoode all give the impression of claiming rank or official position and would not be registerable. However, Seamstress of York is unlikely to be understood to be the only seamstress, or an official seamstress and so would be registerable.

Finally, we are adding a new section to PN.4 to address claims of non-human status, such as being a territorial unit. We are adding PN.4.E., effective immediately, which reads:

E. Claim of Non-Human Status: A personal name may not give the false appearance of being a territorial name, a rank or title, or an order or award; a name may make the appearance of a household name on a case by case basis. A personal name may not be identical to the name of any non-personal entity we protect.

For example, while Town and Kingdom can both be documented as given names, both Town of Princeton and Kingdom of Ealdormere create the false appearance of being a territorial entity. Similarly, while House can be documented as a given name, House of York creates the false appearance of being a famous English royal household. However, Kingdom Jones or House Smith do not give this false appearance.

From Palimpsest: Improving Consistency with Low-Contrast Complex Lines of Division

SENA is somewhat inconsistent in how it describes which low-contrast complex lines of division are registerable; sub-sections of A.3.B.3 say that they must be attested and that Appendix H has a list of acceptable ones, but Appendix H instead describes more generalized standards. Additionally, SENA is inconsistent in terminology, using "poor contrast" sometimes and "low-contrast" other times.

These changes are intended to make things more consistent between A.3.B.3 and Appendix H; however, the primary standard remains identifiability. Regarding "poor contrast" and "low-contrast", we are making the smallest possible change, to make it explicit that we use both interchangeably, in section A.3.B.2.

The current relevant portion of A.3.B.2 reads:

Pairings such as a color and a color or a metal and a metal are said to have poor contrast.

We are changing this portion of A.3.B.2., effective immediately, to read:

Pairings such as a color and a color or a metal and a metal are said to have poor contrast or to be low-contrast.

The current relevant portions of A.3.B.3.a and A.3.B.3.c are identical; both read:

Thus, any pairing of low-contrast tinctures with a complex line of division must be attested in order to be registered. A discussion of currently allowed low-contrast combinations and their designs is included in Appendix H.

We are changing these relevant portions of A.3.B.3.a and A.3.B.3.c, effective immediately to read:

Thus, any pairing of low-contrast tinctures with a complex line of division must meet the standards in Appendix H.

As Appendix H is changing substantially, we are giving only the new version. We are changing Appendix H, effective immediately, to read in whole:

The primary standard for low-contrast complex lines of division is that they be readily identifiable.

In many cases, a charge overlying a low-contrast complex line of division will render the line of division unidentifiable. Thus, divided fields with low-contrast tinctures with complex lines of division will be registered with a charge overlying the line division only if the line of division remains readily identifiable.

In some cases, even if there is no overlying charge, a low-contrast complex line of division may be unidentifiable and thus unregisterable. Similarly, in some cases, the specific shades used in a submission may render a low-contrast complex line of division unidentifiable and thus unregisterable, even if the combination has previously been registered.

Some low-contrast complex line combinations which have been registered recently are:

Some low-contrast complex line combinations which have been ruled unregisterable, even when there is no overlying charge, are:

West Kingdom acceptances

(none).

West Kingdom returns

(none).

In Service,
Gwenhwyfaer ferch Gwilym ap Morgan o Erryrys,
Matins Herald


SUBMISSONS – 15 June, XLVIII (2013)

ITEMS SENT TO LAUREL

Áedán ó Cellaig – New Name

The given name is found in Index of Names in Irish Annals:

Aedan (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Aedan.shtml);
ó Cellaig is also found in the Index of Names in Irish Annals: Cellach/Ceallach (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Cellach.shtml).

See returns for device.


Elizabeth Margarete – New Device (name registered July 2002)

Per chevron dovetailed Or and purpure, two hummingbirds rising respectant and a dragon rampant counterchanged.

No conflict found.


Étaín du Pommier – Change of Device (name registered March 2003)

Per saltire Or and sable, four trefoils counterchanged

No conflict found. Her current device, registered March of 2003 (via the West) Per saltire Or and sable, a pomegranate gules slipped and leaved vert between four trefoils counterchanged is to be retained as a badge.


James Bacon – Resubmission of device to Laurel (name registered December 2012)

Purpure, a polypus between three roundels argent.
This is a resubmission. Her previous device is returned in the December 2012 LoAR for violating SENA A2C1. She has redrawn the polypus as directed. In fact, depiction of the polypus is taken from illustration #449 in “A Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry etc.” by Bruce Draconarius of Mistholm and Akagawa Yoshio (c. 1992). No conflict was found. Yes, the field is purpure! And a very lovely royal purple at that. I don’t know why the scan looks as blue as it does, but I can assure everyone that the submission is purple.


Morgana di Marco Vecchietti – New name and device

Per bend sinister vert and Or, two fleurs-de-lys and a bordure counterchanged

Morgana appears in the literature of medieval and renaissance Italy, specifically in the discussion of poets of the 13th C, showing Ginevra for Guinevere, Isaotta for Iseult, and Morgana for Morgan (Gardner, Edmund G., Arthurian Legend in Italian Literature, Letchworth, Hertfordshire: Temple Press 1930, pp. 33-36); Ginevra being a documented Italian feminine name, found in “A Listing of all Women’s Given Names from the Condado Section of the Florence Catasto of 1427”; St. Gabriel (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/Juliana/condado/womensal pha.html ).

Marco found as a common given name in “Online Tratte of Office Holders 1282-1532” (http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/tratte ).

Vecchietti found as a common surname in “Online Tratte of Office Holders 1282-1532” (http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/tratte ).

“Notes on Names” to the Online Tratte states “…particles (Da, De’, Dell’, Degli) were often omitted, especially for casate that appeared the most frequently. Thus, “De Medici” always appears as “Medici”; “Degli Albizzi” as “Albizzi.” Thus, the formation “di Marco Vecchietti” can be extrapolated. Note that in the Tratte, there are numerous entries showing “given name” – “given name” – “surname”.

Device: No conflict found; submitter has been instructed to draw the bordure thicker.


Robert d’Audrieu – New device only (name registered March 2004 Drachenwald)

Counter-ermine, on a pale argent two ravens sable.
No conflicts found.


Tama Katerina Evstokh’eva – Change of name from Katerina Evstokh’eva, registered October 2004

Tama is a plausible feminine variant of “Tam” 1071, s.n. Tam “theme” in Wickenden (359). Examples include Zhdan/Zhdana “waited for”, Kras/Krasa “beautiful”, “Slav/Slava “glory”, Rad/Rada “joy”, Mir/Mira “peace/earth”, all in Wickenden (http://russianscaheraldry.wikispaces.com/Feminization+Patterns )

Katerina Evstokh’eva is already registered to this submitter and was documented when registered.

Katerina - Katerina Vsevolozha 1108 s.n. Ekaterina in Wickenden.

Evstokh'eva - standard feminine patronymic form of Evstokhii, 4th century martyr venerated in orthodox Russia s.n. Evstokhii in Wickenden. See Wickenden's Grammar, Type 1 Patronymic (-ii > -'ev > 'eva).

The pattern of double Christian name, one Christian (Katerina) and one Slavic (Tama) + marked patronymic (Evstokh’eva) is listed in SENA Appendix A.


Thorir Kraki - New name; device returned

Thorir – found in Geirr Bassi, page 16.

Kraki on page 24.


ITEMS RETURNED FOR FURTHER WORK

Áedán ó Cellaig -- device returned for redrawing

Per pale wavy azure and sable seme of shamrocks argent, in pale two lions rampant argent.
The black and white outline drawing of the armory should be exactly that – a line drawing with NO space colored. This means that sable areas should NOT be filled in.

Appendix H of SENA forbids azure and sable (low contrast) fields with complex line of division.

This is probably clear of the device of Bainard Grey (Jan 03) Per pale sable and azure, two lions doubly-queued argent.


Thorir Kraki – device returned

Per chevron Or and sable, two ravens displayed wings inverted (heads to corners sort of) and a wolf passant to sinister counterchanged.
The device seems clear of conflict, but is returned for redrawing. The ravens are not in a blazonable position, and the “wolf” is not in a heraldic posture for a canine.


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