Minutes of the January, 2011 Heralds Meeting

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MINUTES OF THE MONTHLY MEETING – 9 January XLV (2011)

The meeting was held on Sunday, 9 January 2011, at the 12th Night hotel. The meeting started at about 10:30AM and was cut short at 2PM to vacate the room. In attendance at this meeting were: Owen ap Morgan, Matins; Moira O’Connor, Vesper; Ketiley inn hvitr, Banner; Gwenhwyfaer ferch Gwilym, Brachet; Eilis O’Byrne, Baldric; Anne FitzRichard, Greencloak; Astri­ of Swansvale, Latimer; Hirsch von Henford, Golem; Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn, Harpy; Maxen Dawel ap Morgan, Exchequer; Jared of Castlewood, Pinnacle; Khaalid al-Jaraad, Snowbound; Matilda FitzRichard, Acting Nebuly; Caoilinn Rose Maddox, Glora Fjord; Frederick of Holland, PaL; DanńÚ FitzRoberts, PEaL; Rionagh nic GrainÚ ui Harteigh; Sakura; Volker von dem Walde; Seraphina Blakeburn; Ana Maria de Acosta; Vincenzo Saracini; Seamus of Rivenoak; Mariana Silversea; and Zotikos the Cretan.

COLLEGE OF HERALDS MEETINGS
Future 2011 meetings are currently scheduled for February 6, March 13, April 3 (rescheduled to avoid the Kingdom officers' meeting on the 17th), May 8, June 5, July 10, August 21, September 11, October 23, and November 20. We do not presently intend to hold a meeting in December 2011. Meetings start at noon, unless otherwise announced.

PLEASE NOTE: Unless and until specified otherwise, the regular meetings are now taking place in Stockton at the home of Owen ap Morgan, Matins Herald:

2023 Oak Branch Dr
Stockton, CA 95205
(209) 463-6861 (message)
Contact Owen for directions. The drive is approximately an hour from Sacramento and an hour and a half from either Berkeley or San Jose via Livermore.

Walk-in submissions are generally permitted but not encouraged, as they do not allow for advance review and prep work.. If you are bringing the paperwork for a submission to a meeting, please plan to arrive by 11:00 am to allow the file to be pulled or set up. For meetings not held in Stockton (Collegium, 12th Night, etc.) sufficient advance notice to pull any existing file will be required.

We are conducting some preliminary name research through the West Kingdom heraldic consultation mailing list wkheralds_consults@yahoogroups.com . This list is open to all those interested in West Kingdom book heraldry: both names and devices, and either to contribute or to ask questions. To join the list, please subscribe through Yahoo or at wkheralds_consults-subscribe@yahoogroups.com. If you subscribe by e-mail, you can complete the process by replying to the confirmation e-mail; it is not necessary to log in to Yahoo. Please note that initial posts are moderated and thus may not appear on the list immediately.

PERSONNEL -- RECENT CHANGES AND POSITIONS AVAILABLE:


REPORTS

Moira, Vesper- The roster is up to date and has been presented to Their Majesties. We have settled on dates for meeting for the upcoming year. Please mark your calendars.

Anne, Green Cloak – Had plenty of help for 12th night. White Shield is coming in March and that is an excellent training opportunity before tournament season starts in earnest.

Ketiley, Banner- Courts at 12th night were covered well. Some of the ceremonies need to be worked on for awkward wording.

Eilis, Baldric- Since doing classes at Collegium was not successful, we're planning on doing classes at local collegia this year. Probable venues include Golden Rivers in Cynagua, Southern Shores in the Mists and a site to be determined in Oertha.

Owen, Matins – We have switched to using the heraldic consultation mailing list for name research in advance of the meetings, but there's not much response. Keep in mind that no particular experience or expertise is needed to check out online documentation - just net access to verify URLs and see what a page says about a name. Checking out documentation is a useful way to learn about it. Visitors are welcome at the kingdom heraldry meetings. If there is interest, we can hold classes and/or training after the close of official business (but not in February, since the meeting is on Super Bowl Sunday.)

Astri­, Latimer- The plan for this year is to have consulting at the crown tourneys and at least one coronet tourney each for the Mists and Cynagua.

Gwenhwyfaer, Brachet- Meetings are being held every Monday at Gwenhwyfaer's house in Golden Rivers. We are finishing the Nov. letters. This is a good opportunity to learn book heraldry. East bay brachet is meeting at Astri­'s house.

Hirsch, Golem- The website is up to date. Officers are encouraged to use the 'Words from' section.

Gillian, Seawolf – Nothing new to report.

Zaid, Sable Swan – No report.

Clare, Stellanordica – No report.

Maxen, exchequer- We have money. Someone has shown interest in being deputy and possibly taking over.


ANNOUNCEMENTS

SUBMISSIONS GUIDELINES
UPCOMING EVENTS
This year's Known World Heraldic and Scribal Symposium will be held in Atlantia, in High Point, North Carolina on the weekend of June 24-26, 2011. The symposium is a chance to meet top heralds from throughout the Known World and take classes at various levels. If you care to attend, it's not too soon to be making arrangements.

GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

VOICE HERALDRY: Greencloak will continue to hold voice heraldry training sessions at the beginning of events to encourage involvement at the event.

MAILING LIST: The West Kingdom College of Heralds has a mailing list for internal communication. Any herald is welcome to join by request. To join the list, please subscribe at wkheralds-subscribe@yahoogroups.com.

ELECTRONIC RESOURCES: Many interesting heraldic links can be found through the SCA Heraldry web page at http://www.sca.org/heraldry, including the Laurel home page, the on-line Armorial and Ordinary (with search capabilities) and The Academy of St. Gabriel (an onomastic and heraldic consultation service). The West Kingdom Heraldry site and the West Kingdom Awards List can be accessed through the West Kingdom site, http://www.westkingdom.org. Heraldic queries may also be addressed to Moira at herald@westkingdom.org -- answers may take a few days.

West Kingdom College of Heralds Minutes are published on the web. They may be read at or printed from the heralds' website at http://heralds.westkingdom.org/Minutes.htm. There is a colored version and a printer-friendly black and white version available.

BRACHET MEETINGS
These meetings comment on heraldic submissions from other Kingdoms. The meetings are held most Mondays at 7:00 pm at 4317 Alderwood Way, Sacramento, CA 95864. Call Gwenhwyfaer ferch Gwilym (Brachet) for more information, (916) 323-4268 or email her, .

EAST BAY COMMENTING MEETINGS
These meetings comment on heraldic submissions from other Kingdoms. Please consider attending – you do not have to be able to attend every week. They are a fast way to learn how the Rules of Submission work and how to research armory. These meetings have changed location and are now in Walnut Creek on Wednesday nights. If you are interested, contact the Latimer Herald, Astri­ of Swansvale (Gretchen Lebednik) at .


EXCERPTS FROM THE LOAR

The cover letters, acceptances and returns for the past can be found at http://www.sca.org/heraldry/loar/. If you are interested in responding to some of the calls for commentary put out by the Laurel Queen of Arms, please be sure to visit the site.

NOVEMBER 2010 LOAR

Cover Letter

From Pelican: Some Name Resources (a series)

Names in some languages spoken in Asia (Japanese, Arabic) are quite well documented by Society scholars, making names in those languages relatively easy to construct. Other Asian cultures are less well documented, making the lives of submitters and heralds quite difficult. This section will help you to figure out how to document an Asian name, first by pointing you toward some sources for documenting names, then explaining some of the standards used by the College of Arms and how to meet them for those other languages.

Before you get started on a difficult project, take a look at what others have done. I start with the Academy of Saint Gabriel library (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/), which has sections on "Arabic, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Names," "Central Asian Names," "Ancient Iranian Names," "Mongol Names," "Indian Names," "Chinese Names," and "Japanese Names." The one important print source I use for Asian names is Solveig Throndardottir's Name Construction in Medieval Japan, which can be bought from Potboiler Press (http://potboilerpress.com/). It has large numbers of historical names of various sorts; in another month, I'll discuss how to use it most efficiently.

One of the first tricks is figuring out what language(s) you're dealing with. In India, for example, there were (and are) dozens of languages spoken. I often depend on online scholarship to answer these questions. Two useful sources are Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org), which has surprisingly extensive articles on the history of individual languages, and Ethnologue (http://www.ethnologue.com/), which is an online version of the standard reference on the modern distribution of the languages of the world (But don't forget: Wikipedia is not acceptable as the sole documentation for a name or name element). Between them, you can generally figure out what language(s) you might find in an area. This is important, because if you propose to mix names elements from two different times and/or languages, you need to be able to address whether they are compatible with one another. Even in a single time and place, there can be multiple languages represented; for example, Japanese names use both Japanese and Chinese readings of kanji, though generally not in a single name.

To register a personal name from a non-European culture, you need to present evidence that the culture in question had contact with Europe and Europeans before 1600. But before you get too concerned about presenting that evidence, take a look through LoARs to see if we've registered other names from that culture. If we've registered a name from that culture recently, don't worry too much about proving that contact again. However, there are many cultures that have not been shown to be registerable. A discussion of the kinds of evidence one might present is given in the January 2003 Cover Letter, dealing with Tibetan names. Note that second-hand contact (contact with a group of people who had contact with Europe) is not sufficient. In the case of India, we often look to the late-period Portuguese coastal possessions as evidence for contact. History books are generally necessary to argue for these points, as websites created by private individuals often include poorly sourced information and cannot be trusted.

You must then present evidence that the names are properly constructed and were used before 1600. For the first part, modern books of names and surnames may help, but they rarely help for the second. With the rise of Google Books and other internet sources, searching to see if a modern name was used before 1600 is often pretty simple. However, that very simplicity means that we are far less likely to give benefit of the doubt to a name element that appears only as a modern name.

Finally, you must present evidence that the name as a whole is appropriately constructed. We require all names to consist of at least two elements: a given name (or something that functions like one) and a byname (or something that functions like one). That can be difficult for some poorly documented Asian languages, but presenting names that seem to follow the pattern is the best way. If you can't find appropriate patterns for bynames, one solution is to construct a Lingua Anglica form of a byname. The use of the Lingua Anglica allowance was discussed at great length in the January 2009 Cover Letter.

For Asian names, locative bynames are often a good candidate. Remember that the Lingua Anglica allowance requires the use of the standard modern English form of the name. For this reason, of Bangalore or of Beijing are registerable under this allowance, while of Bengalooru or of Daidu are not (although these other names have also been used for those cities).

West Kingdom Acceptances

Alizan De la Fontaine. Name change from Alison Gray of Owlwood.

Her previous name, Alison Gray of Owlwood, is released.

Eleanor atte Walter de Liverpoole. Name.

Submitted as Eleanor atte Walter of Liverpoole, the name was changed at Kingdom to Eleanor atte Water of Liverpool. The submitter requested authenticity for "13-14th Century English." Commenters were able to find evidence of both the byname atte Walter and the spelling poole in 14th century England. We have changed the spellings back to the submitted forms.

The Letter of Intent asked for assistance in documenting two locative bynames in this style. Edelweiss was able to provide several examples of this pattern in the United Kingdom National Archives:

SC 8/3/127: [?1320]: Roger atte Crouche de Mentemor

SC 8/5/231: [1322]: William atte Kyrke de Kyrkeby

SC 8/6/296: [1322]: Piers atte See de Ravenserodde

SC 8/17/844: [c.1327]: Richard atte Knolle de Bageschote

SC 8/22/1071: [1397]: Robt atte Mulle de Guldeford

A single locative byname in English can be registered using of as a preposition, but a name with multiple locative bynames like this must follow closely a period pattern for such bynames. As all these examples use the preposition de, we have changed of to de in order to register it.

This name is authentic for 14th century English, though a name as complicated as this is uncommon.

Robert Hunteman. Name and device. Vert, a hunting horn and on a chief argent three talbot's heads couped sable.

Nice 13th century English name!

┌lfar inn svarti ١risson. Device. Per pale wavy azure and argent, a wolf passant contourny sable and in chief two decrescents argent and sable.

William atte Walter de Liverpoole. Name.

Submitted as William atte Walter of Liverpoole, the name was changed at Kingdom to William atte Water of Liverpool. The submitter requested authenticity for "13-14th Century English." Commenters were able to find evidence of both the byname atte Walter and the spelling poole in 14th century England. We have changed the spellings back to the submitted forms.

The Letter of Intent asked for assistance in documenting two locative bynames in this style. Edelweiss was able to provide several examples of this pattern in the United Kingdom National Archives:

SC 8/3/127: [?1320]: Roger atte Crouche de Mentemor

SC 8/5/231: [1322]: William atte Kyrke de Kyrkeby

SC 8/6/296: [1322]: Piers atte See de Ravenserodde

SC 8/17/844: [c.1327]: Richard atte Knolle de Bageschote

SC 8/22/1071: [1397]: Robt atte Mulle de Guldeford

A single locative byname in English can be registered using of as a preposition, but a name with multiple locative bynames like this must follow closely a period pattern for such bynames. As all these examples use the preposition de, we have changed of to de in order to register it.

This name is authentic for 14th century English, though a name as complicated as this is uncommon.

West Kingdom Returns

None.

In Service,
Owen ap Morgan
Matins Herald


SUBMISSONS – 9 January, XLV (2011)

ITEMS SENT TO LAUREL

Alfarr Utherson - New name and device

Per chevron sable and gules, two portcullises and a cross gurgity Or.

Alfarr is a Norse masculine given name. The submitter documents it from the Viking Answer Lady web page at http://www.vikinganswerlady.com/ONMensNames.shtml and the Nordiskt runnamnslexikon by Lena Peterson, translated by C.L. Ward; in each case Alfarr is the header spelling, but neither gives a specific date. Lind (s.n. Alfarr) cites "Alfarr Gandalfs s. brßvallakappi Ark X 2299."

Utherson is an English patronymic byname. The submitter offers no documentation beyond quoting the West Kingdom minutes of July 2005 regarding the submitted name Leif Utherson:

Uther is British/Arthurian. It was registered several times recently, including in 2003 and 2004. In a Welsh context, we find Uthar ap Elider B&Y 1315. Bromwich "The Welsh Triads" also notes a couple of examples.
Leif's file includes no print documentation. The name Leif Utherson was registered without comment in the November 2005 LOAR (A-West). We realize that past registration is not documentation in itself, and request any assistance necessary in fleshing this out.


Caleb Maxwell - New name (see Returns for device)

Caleb is an English masculine given name. Withycombe (s.n. Caleb) cites a Caleb Willis as "a Westminster scholar in 1585".

Maxwell is an English locative byname. Black (s.n. Maxwell) does not cite a period instance of this particular spelling, but does cite Maxuel 1424, Maxvall 1583, Maxvile 1407, and both Maxwaile and Maxwale from 1452 for the first syllable and Makiswell 1414 for the second, so the submitted spelling should be plausible for the 1400s.


Cormac an Ci˙in - New name (see Returns for device)

Cormac is an Irish masculine given name. OC&M (s.n. Cormacc) cite Cormac mac Ailella 713, Cormac mac Cuilennßin 908, and Cormac Mac Carthaig 1138, along with various saints having the name.

an Ci˙in is intended to be a descriptive byname meaning "the quiet" in Irish Gaelic. Malcolm Maclennan's Gaelic Dictionary (under ci¨in) identifies ci˙in as Middle Irish meaning "quiet, calm, gentle." Tne "Index of Names in Irish Annals: Masculine Descriptive Bynames" by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (Kathleen M. O'Brien), online at http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Alpha.shtml, lists various descriptive bynames regarding temperament or personality, e.g., Ainsheasccar "[the] Unquiet/Restless", Amhreaidh "[the] Quarrelsom/Contentious", Bradach "[the] Thievish", CerrbÚl "[the] Wry-mouth[ed]", and CÝocarach "[the] Greedy/Ravenous", so this would appear to be a plausible byname. The submitter allows all changes, so the article can be dropped and the grammar adjusted if necessary.


Danegeld Tor, Shire of - New change of designator and badge

(Fieldless) A drakkar sable, sail set argent and charged with two axes in saltire, heads addorsed, sable.

While currently identified in the Laurel files as a "Riding", Danegeld Tor is now a Shire.


Ketiley hviti - New name and device

Vert, a bend wavy between two tree stumps eradicated argent.

Submitted as Ketiley hi­ hvÝtur, intended to mean "Ketiley the fair/white", opinion at the meeting was that the byname used a strictly modern spelling. We have substituted a documented alternative, but request any available assistance either in more closely matching the submitted version or adjusting it further if necessary.

Ketiley is intended to be a Norse feminine given name. [Note the submission of Ketiley drekkistunga in the October 15, 2010 Atenveldt LOI accessible through OSCAR at http://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=100&loi=884.] This spelling appears as a header on the Viking Answer Lady page at http://www.vikinganswerlady.com/ONWomensNames.shtml, which states in part "Found in Old Swedish as KŠtil°. Runic examples include nominative case katily, ketilau, [ketilau], [ketilu], [kitilau] and genitive case ketilyaR." The spelling KŠtil°y is a header in the Nordiskt runnamnslexikon by Lena Peterson, translated by C.L. Ward, which also cites the examples quoted on the Viking Answer Lady web page.

The consulting herald prepared the following argument:

Given the information set forth below, it appears that the feminine name Ketiley is a reasonable variant spelling for Old Norse KŠtil°y. There are several first element variants of "Ketill", all or most of which appear to have been used interchangeably in Old Norse (ON) although we are only interested in two of them here. And there are three last element variants of "Ey", two of which appear in Old Norse feminine names.
"For the first element Ketil- or KŠtil- see below. For the second element -ey or -°y see second below. Found in Old Swedish as KŠtil°. Runic examples include nominative case katily, ketilau, [ketilau], [ketilu], [kitilau] and genitive case ketilyaR.
"The first element Ketil- or KŠtil- is from OW.Norse ketill, originally "kettle" but meaning also "helmet" or "chieftain with helmet."
"The second element -ey or -°y is of uncertain origin but may derive either from a feminine form of Primitive Scandinavian auja "happiness, luck, (luck) giver" or may be related to closely related to Primitive Scandinavian *awiˇ "island", Old Icelandic ey, "island." The word ey is also used as a poetic circumlocution for "woman", and in poetical diction ey is personified as a goddess, the sea being her girdle, the glaciers her head-gear."
[Viking Answer Lady webpage, accessed December 13, 2010 at 10:30 PM]
KŠtil°y appears in the Nordic Names Wiki which states that it is an Old Norse name, a combination of KETILL and EY.[1] The wiki goes on to provide information on both KETILL and EY. [Nordic Names Wiki, accessed December 13, 2010 at 10:24 PM]
KETILL (Germanic name element)
Old Norse ketill = 'cauldron hat, helmet' [1]
Old Norse kettil (?) = 'cauldron, helmet' [2]
Old Norse ketill = 'cauldron' [3] [4]
Old Norse ketill = 'sacrificial cauldron' (in names) [3]
Old Norse ketill = 'helmet' (in names) [3]
Old Swedish kŠtil = 'cauldron' [4]
First Element Forms Kel- Kell- Ketil- Ketill- Kińl- Kińll- Kjel- Kjell- Kjńll- KŠl- Kńtil- KŠtil- Kńttil-
The Nordic Names Wiki database shows that both the form KŠtil- and the form Ketil- were in use in Old Norse names. Attested Old Norse feminine names using Ketil- are Ketilbjorg, Ketillaug, KetilrÝ­r, and KetilvÚ, while forms using KŠtil- are KŠtilfrÝ­r, KŠtilgŠr­r, KŠtillaug, KŠtillauga, KŠtilvÝ, KŠtilŠlfR, and KŠtil°y. Both Ketill and KŠtill are listed as variant Old Norse spellings of the masculine name. KetilrÝ­r is stated to be an Old Norse variant form of the Old Norse KŠtilfrÝ­r, while Ketilbjorg is apparently attested to only in the Ketil- form and KŠtilgŠr­r and KŠtil°y are documented only in the KŠtil- form. Other Old Norse variant spellings are listed below. It appears that Ketil- and KŠtil- were interchangeable in Old Norse along with other first element spelling variations.
ON ON variant spelling
Ketilbjorg Kjellbjorg (another Old Norse variant spelling of Ketil-)
KŠtilfrÝ­r KetilrÝ­r [1] [5]
KŠtillaug Ketillaug [1] [5]
KŠtilvÝ KetilvÚ [1]

EY (Germanic name element of uncertain meaning)
Often, instead for the 'island'-meaning below, a connection to the name element AUJA is suggested. In some combinations it is difficult or impossible to tell if the element belongs to the element AI instead.
Proto-Norse *awi?o = 'island' [1]
Old Norse ey = 'island' [6]
Old Norse ey = 'island, flat land along a coast' [7]
Old Norse ?ey = 'island, floodplain' [8]
Gothic *awi- = 'island, floodplain' [9]
Old English Ýe?g = 'island' [8]
Old High German ouwe = 'water, stream, land by water, floodplain, island' [7]
Middle Low German ˘ = 'island, floodplain' [7]
Middle Low German ˘ge = 'island, floodplain' [7]
Middle Low German ˘ch = 'island, floodplain' [7]
Middle Low German ou = 'island, floodplain' [7]
Middle Low German ouwe = 'island, floodplain' [7]
Last Element Forms -ey -° -°y
The data in NNW shows that both -ey and -°y are used as endings for Old Norse feminine names. I located nine Old Norse feminine names in database which NNW stated were related to this name element. Four of them had the -ey ending and five of them used the -°y ending. Four of the names also appeared in Icelandic using the -ey ending, including one which appeared in Old Norse with the -°y ending. It appears that either ending can be used in old Norse.
ON Icelandic
Bˇtey
Bjargey Bjargey
Bjarney Bjarney
Daney Daney
Gull°y
Ingi°y Ingey
KŠtil°y
HlÝf°y
LÝf°y
Sand°y
Given the relative paucity of recorded Old Norse feminine names it seems reasonable to allow logical constructions which appear to follow the general rules of construction for similar names.
Below I've included the relevant citations mentioned in both websites I consulted for the convenience of anyone who wants to look up the originals and translate them. They are keyed into the text above by the endnote numbers.
1. Lena Peterson: Nordiskt runnamnslexikon (2002).
2. Roland Otterbj÷rk: Svenska f÷rnamn (1979).
3. Kristoffer Kruken og Ola Stemshaug: Norsk Personnamnleksikon (1995).
4. Elias WessÚn: Vňra ord (1997).
5. Kristoffer Kruken og Ola Stemshaug: Norsk Personnamnleksikon (1995).
6. Leiv Heggstad, Finn H°dneb° og Erik Simensen: Norr°n Ordbok (1997).
7. Hjalmar Falk & Alf Torp: Etymologisk ordbok over det norske og det danske sprog (1999).
8. Ferdinand Holthausen: Vergleichendes und Etymologisches W÷rterbuch des Altwestnordischen (1948).
9. Ferdinand Holthausen: Gotisches etymologisches W÷rterbuch (1934).

The interchangeability of KŠtil- with Ketil- seems solid. Regarding -°y vs. -ey I found a single example in Lind of the same name with spellings differing only by that change: Under the header Ůorey the header spelling is cited from 1429, plus an undated reference to a Ůor°y a Mork. There are, however, few names indexed with the terminal element -ey.

Possibly relevant, this substitution is fairly common as the first element of names. In Lind we find:

Based on all this we believe Ketiley to be a plausible variant spelling of the name.

hviti is a Norse descriptive byname. Lind Personbinamn (s.n. HvÝti) cites Ormr hv. 1236, Bersi hviti 1241, Skeggi hv. 1251, Ůorkell hv. 1253, and numerous others.


Nicolai Sewolt von Sachsen - New name and device

Purpure, two mullets of eight points and an anchor Or.

Submitted as Nicolai Sewolt Von Sachsen (changed by the submitter from Nicolai Sewolt Von Sachen, we have removed the erroneous capitalization of the preposition.

Nicolai is a Russian masculine given name. Wickenden (s.n. Nikolai) dates the header spelling to 1291, with the variants Nicolao from 1290 and Nicolaus from 1289.

Sewolt is a German patronymic byname. Brechenmacher (s.n. Sewolt) cites the name "Haintz S. zu Agawang" from Zusmarshausen (in Bavaria) from 1424, which also shows the pattern of this name (given + patronym + locative).

von Sachsen is a German locative. The December 2009 LOAR, A-Ealdormere, Dietrich von Sachsen, states:

The German name for Saxony is Sachsen; this spelling is found in the 16th C according to Aryanhwy merch Catmael, "German Place Names from a 16th C Czech Register". We have changed the byname to von Sachsen in order to register it.

We expect that the use of the Russian given name with the German bynames is no more than an SFPP.

The points of the mullets are irregular, with the cardinal points being wider but not significantly longer than the intermediary ones. As this is not typical of compass stars, I have not blazoned them as such. The submitted blazon has the mullets as secondaries in chief, but they do not seem clearly so. We hope the irregularity in the drawing warrants no more than a note to the artist.

I further note the registered device of Martin of the Fallen Star, "Purpure, in base a mullet of twelve points Or." (Nov. 1973) The prevailing opinion at the meeting was that this should be clear of conflict, so I'm sending it on; I mention it only because I'm not entirely sure how.


Seraphina Blackburn - New name and device

Per bend sinister sable and gules, on a bend sinister between an eye and a heart argent, ladybugs gules marked sable.

Originally on the forms as Seraphina Blakeburn, the submitter (present at the meeting) indicated a preference for the spelling Blackburn but had not found specific documentation for it. As we were able to argue for her preferred spelling as being plausibly period, we have changed it to that at her request.

Seraphina is stated by the submitter to be the name of an Italian saint from the 13th century, citing the web pages "Catholic Online" at http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=750 and http://www.ewtn.com/library/mary/seraphin.htm. Neither of these, unfortunately, gives any indication whether this is a period spelling. Academy of Saint Gabriel report #1679, online at http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi?1679+0, notes the 13th C saint and a 15th C Blessed Seraphina Sforza, but observes that these are modern spellings. The same report, however, cites the masculine Seraphin from France in the 9th C and Poland in 1228, 1410, and 1478 and states the latter "could be feminized by adding '-a'."

Blackburn is an English locative surname. Ekwall (s.n. Blackburn) cites the spelling Blakeburn from 1187. The spelling Black- entered English place names in period, e.g., Ekwall (s.n. Blackwater) cites the header spelling from 1576 and 1577. The OED appears to date the spelling black for the color to 1420.

In the June 2010 LOAR, A-Atenveldt, the name Seraphina Jameson was registered with the observation that "This name combines a Latinized Italian given name with a byname which could be Scots or English; either combination is a step from period practice." We take this to mean that the name submitted here should also be acceptable, albeit with a single SFPP.

Yes, the device is intended to mean "I love ladybugs."


Sven Gotfriedson - New name and device

Per chevron vert and azure, three mullets of eight points in chevron Or and a sealion argent.

Sven is a Danish masculine given name. Danmarks Gamle Personnavne (Fornavne) by Knudsen, Kristensen and Hornby (DGP) (s.n. Swen, col.1323) cites a Sven Thores: from 1423.

Gotfriedson is a constructed spelling of a Danish patronymic byname. DGP (s.n. Guthfrith, col.423) cites Godfried, Godfrid from 1333, Gotfridh Skytt{ae} from 1356, Matheum Godefriiths: ("-s:" is an abbreviation for "-son") from 1329, along with numerous other variants showing interchangeability of Got- with God-. Gotfriedson seems a plausible spelling variant of the patronymic based on these.


Zotikos the Cretan - Resub to kingdom (Mar. 2010) of change of holding name

Submission history: In Dec. 1995 Laurel returned the name submission Balin Fear-Dàna., stating:

Malory's Balin is probably from Belin(us), which is apparently a Latinized form of the Welsh name Beli. It isn't clear that it was ever used as a name outside of literature; we may give it the benefit of the doubt on that score, but when written in Irish (as with this byname) it would have been given an Irish form. We are unable to guess what that might have been. O'Brien (Corpus Genealogiarum Hiberniæ, p. 518) notes one instance of a name Belán; Belán Ferdána seems to be an acceptable early Irish name. (A late form would probably be Bealán Feardána.) The alternative would be to use an English or Anglo-French form of the byname, e.g., Gleman, Harper, Mynstrall, le Singere, etc. These changes are hardly minor, so we are returning the name to let him choose.

The accompanying device was registered under the holding name Scott of Golden Rivers.

In Mar. 2010 the West Kingdom returned the submitted change of holding name to Xotikos Aegocerus on the grounds that tranliterating the given name with an 'X' had not been justified, and the byname had not been documented as being used to describe humans. This third attempt has now ensued.

Zotikos is a Greek masculine given name. The Lexicon of Greek Personal Names, online at http://www.lgpn.ox.ac.uk/online/downloads/documents/namfor2a.pdf, lists the Greek ???????, which transliterates to the submitted spelling.

the Cretan is a Lingua Anglica locative byname referring to the Mediterranean island of Crete, inhabited since before the Classical era. According to the submitter, "I selected it because I am facinated [sic] by the myth, legend, and rich history of the island of Crete, my enjoyment of word play, and I like to eat with my hands." It is the considered and collective opinion of the members of the West Kingdom COH (of whom the submitter is one) that the name suits him admirably.


ITEMS RETURNED FOR FURTHER WORK

Andrew of Viklund - New name and device NOT PAID

Vert, three triangles conjoined one and two and a chief embattled Or.

We could cope with there being just one copy of the name form. We could cope with the device being on Lochac forms. What we're not prepared to cope with is that the heraldic submissions were sent together with an application for associate membership in SCA, Inc. - and payment was made only for the latter.

If the submitter will send proper payment for his heraldic submissions, and by preference send two copies of the name form complete with documentation, then we will consider the items at that time.


Caleb Maxwell - New device

Sable, on a pile raguly azure a clenched gauntlet argent.

This is not chaussÚ, the lines of which would extend from the three corners of the shield. Further, either as chaussÚ or a pile it violates the rules of contrast (chaussÚ is not a division of the field into two equal parts, so its pieces must have good contrast.) Even if this were rendered as per chevron inverted, which is the nearest thing that might be permitted, it still might not pass. Low contrast complex lines of division must be recognizable, and the line here is effectively invisible at any distance.

While it must be blazoned as a pile, because of the similarity it is still checked for conflict as a gauntlet on a chaussÚ field. Contrary to what was opined at the meeting, it seems we currently do give a CD between an open and a clenched hand:

Hitherto, we have likewise granted no difference between an open hand and a closed or clenched hand. After reviewing period examples, we have decided to grant a CD between the two.
(Mar. 2006 LOAR, A-Atenveldt, Johnathan Crusadene Whitewolf) Consequently, this does not conflict with protected armory such as Isengard "Sable, a hand argent." It likely does conflict, however, with the badge of Daffyd ap Morran for House Brithael, "Quarterly gules and Or, a sinister gauntlet grasping a rose slipped and leaved argent." One CD for the field, but to grasp the rose the gauntlet is likely clenched, and the rose may well be a maintained charge contributing no difference. This should be considered in resubmitting. If the submitter desires, a scan of Daffyd's registered emblazon can be obtained from the Laurel files for comparison.


Cormac an Ci˙in - New device

Sable, on a "pile" argent, two ravens' heads addorsed conjoined at the neck sable.

This conflicts with the badge of Morgan MacNeil of Clan Fergus "Sable, on a pile argent a sword inverted gules, the hilt between three crescents, one and two, azure." There is only one CD for the cumulative changes to the charges on the pile.

In resubmitting, please note that as drawn this is neither chaussÚ (which must extend from the three corners of the shield, which this does not) nor truly a pile (the lines of which should reach the top of the shield significantly inset from the corners.) It must be drawn clearly one or the other to be registered, but either way it will still conflict with Morgan unless some other change is made to the design.

Blazoned on the form as "a double headed crow erased", this is clearly just a pair of heads conjoined. (A double-headed bird still has a body, wings, legs, and a tail.) The heads are not erased, which would involve more jags going in different directions. As it is, the heads are so nearly crescents that I seriously question whether they are recognizable as heads at any distance. Charges must be clearly identifiable to be registered.


Haley Hrossmear - New name and device

Argent estencely sable, a seahorse vert.

Haley is said to be the submitter's legal given name, but no proof to that effect was provided. Proof can be either a photocopy of a legal document (if something like a driver's license or passport is used, black out the ID number and any personal information other than the name for security) or a signed statement by a senior herald attesting that such a document has been examined and does show the legal name to be as stated.

Hrossmear is said to be a byname meaning "horse woman" or "horse maiden". No documentation was provided, nor could any be found during the meeting. The consulting herald states that the submitter was warned not to send the forms in until documentation could be obtained. Such warnings should be taken seriously; the College is under no obligation to remedy a lack of documentation. We will usually do so if we reasonably can, but that should not be taken for granted.

Please note that by current precedent, descriptive Norse bynames cannot be capitalized.

We found no problems with the device, but cannot send it to Laurel without a name submission.


Helga Hrossmear - New name and device

Gyronny gules and argent, a horse's head couped within a bordure sable.

Helga is a Norse feminine given name cited in Geirr Bassi.

Hrossmear is said to be a byname meaning "horse lady". No documentation was provided, nor could any be found during the meeting. The consulting herald states that the submitter was warned not to send the forms in until documentation could be obtained. Such warnings should be taken seriously; the College is under no obligation to remedy a lack of documentation. We will usually do so if we reasonably can, but that should not be taken for granted.

Please note that by current precedent, descriptive Norse bynames cannot be capitalized.

This striking device unfortunately conflicts with the device of Bela Aba, "Quarterly gules and Or, a horse's head couped within a bordure sable." There is just one CD for changing the field. In any case, it could not have been sent to Laurel without a name submission.


WALK-IN ITEMS PENDED UNTIL FEBRUARY

Bran MacMurraugh - New name and device

The name is not documented.


Nyfain Maighe Tuireadh - Resub name and device to kingdom (July 2007)

On superficial inspection, I am not convinced the submitter has fully addressed the problems with the byname.


Tiberius Addams - New name and device

The name is not documented.


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